News Articles About College Costs

There are many options for living on or off campus but what’s the best housing option for you?

What Are My Housing Options?

July 22, 2011
by Thomas Lee
There are many options for living on or off campus but what’s the best housing option for you? The most common housing option for a full-time day college student is an on-campus dormitory. As a
Broke college students across the country have reason to rejoice: Amazon has unveiled an e-textbook-rental program which has the potential to save students up to 80 percent on textbooks!

Amazon Launches Digital-Textbook Rental Service

July 21, 2011
by Suada Kolovic
Broke college students across the country have reason to rejoice: Amazon has unveiled an e-textbook-rental program which has the potential to save students up to 80 percent on textbooks! The program

With the soaring prices of college tuition, most college students are trying to get the biggest bang for their buck when paying for school. One way they’re doing this? Having more than one major or minor.

Double Your Potential with a Double Major or Minor

July 15, 2011
by Jacquelene Bennett
With the soaring prices of college tuition, most college students are trying to get the biggest bang for their buck when paying for school. One way they’re doing this? Having more than one major or

When the recession hit in 2008, higher education officials wondered how – not if – enrollment numbers would be impacted. Three years later, the damage has been revealed...and it’s not what anyone anticipated.

The Recession: College’s Sorting Hat?

July 14, 2011
by Alexis Mattera
When the recession hit in 2008, higher education officials wondered how – not if – enrollment numbers would be impacted. Three years later, the damage has been revealed...and it’s not what anyone

Did you know that more than 70 colleges across the country have replaced loans with grants? That’s right: Schools are offering more free money to entice students to enter their hallowed halls, meaning they will not be saddled with the often-dreaded student loan payments after graduation. What institutions come out on top? Here are a few of the best aid policies, courtesy of the Washington Post’s Daniel de Vise:

Princeton University: The Tigers lead the pack time wise, first cutting loans in 1998 and nixing them completely in 2001.

Harvard University: After eliminating loans in 2008, Harvard implemented a “zero to 10” standard, which pledges families earning up to $180,000 will pay 10 percent of their income at most toward college-related fees.

Amherst College: The school replaced loans with grants and work-study for all students in Fall 2008 and the number of students eligible for Pell grants has nearly doubled to 23 percent as a result.

Claremont McKenna and Pomona: Loans were also phased out here in 2008 but not just to help poor students. Roger Huddle, a rising Pomona senior with a household income approaching $100,000, received enough aid to cover roughly two-thirds of the full cost of attendance.

Yale University: The New Haven-based Ivy meets full demonstrated need without loans, capping the contribution at 10 percent of income for families earning up to $130,000.

The Best Financial Aid Policies in Higher Ed

July 13, 2011
by Alexis Mattera
Did you know that more than 70 colleges across the country have replaced loans with grants? That’s right: Schools are offering more free money to entice students to enter their hallowed halls,

Kindles, eBooks and Nooks are all electronic alternatives to traditional paper bound books that are slowly becoming more and more popular. Though I prefer paper bound books, I must admit that I really want a Kindle but this gadget and others like it don’t really have a place in college classrooms (yet) for several reasons.

The Great eReader Debate

July 13, 2011
by Jacquelene Bennett
Kindles, eBooks and Nooks are all electronic alternatives to traditional paper bound books that are slowly becoming more and more popular. Though I prefer paper bound books, I must admit that I

Packing for college can be stressful and frustrating. You buy something you think you are going to need and end up never using it or you forget to buy something and end up making 20 trips to the store on the already crazy move-in day. But fear not, I am here to help.

What You Need (and Don’t Need) on Campus

July 11, 2011
by Jacquelene Bennett
Packing for college can be stressful and frustrating. You buy something you think you are going to need and end up never using it or you forget to buy something and end up making 20 trips to the

There’s good news and bad news regarding state aid for students. The good: State financial aid for college students, including grants, work-study and loans, rose by nearly 4 percent last year. The bad: Just about half of the states surveyed cut need-based grants, even as demand for financial aid increased.

The Good News and Bad News About State Aid for Students

July 11, 2011
by Alexis Mattera
There’s good news and bad news regarding state aid for students. The good: State financial aid for college students, including grants, work-study and loans, rose by nearly 4 percent last year. The
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