Skip Navigation Links

Meet Scholarships.com's Virtual Interns: Chelsea Slaughter

February 6, 2013

Meet Scholarships.com's Virtual Interns: Chelsea Slaughter

by Chelsea Slaughter

Hello Scholarships.com readers! My name is Chelsea Slaughter and I am a junior at Jacksonville State University in Jacksonville, AL. I am majoring in public relations with a minor in art. I did not start off as a public relations major, however: I started off as a graphic design major. I love art and I just knew that it was what I wanted to do with my life after college but as it turned out, I was wrong.

Ever have a hobby that you loved to do in your free time and then you’re forced to do it and it becomes a chore? Well, that’s what happened with me. I didn’t want to draw or design for fun anymore so during the second semester of my freshman year, I decided to change to public relations. I had been doing music promotions on a street team and realized I was really good at it and I made my minor art because I still have passion for it. College is all about learning more about yourself and what suits you. I am very happy I decided to change my major as early as I did!

In my spare time, I enjoy the simple things. I make jewelry, hang with my friends and family and I’m an avid concertgoer, often traveling to see some of my favorite artists perform. I’m very active on campus, maintain a job as a resident assistant and am a member of organizations such as NAACP and Public Relations Organization. As an RA in a freshman dorm, I see first-hand the difficulties that incoming freshmen have to deal with. This is why I wanted to be a Scholarships.com virtual intern: I have gone through the same things and have learned from them. From my experience and knowledge, I feel like I can help many college students facing similar obstacles.

Comments

Four College Majors to Avoid

February 7, 2013

Four College Majors to Avoid

by Suada Kolovic

With recent college graduates facing an unemployment rate of 7.8 percent and substantially lower starting salaries, we have to ask: What path should students take in order to flourish after graduation? And while there isn’t one direct route that translates into success, Georgetown University’s Center on Education has compiled a list of majors that college students should avoid:

  • Liberal Arts (Unemployment Rate for Recent College Graduates 9.2 percent): Studying a broad palette of subjects including everything from literature and philosophy to history and sociology sounds like a dream. Unfortunately, employers may not see a liberal arts degree in the same divine light as the ancient Greeks did.
  • Philosophy and Religious Studies (Unemployment Rate for Recent College Graduates 10.8 percent): With the demand for these two degrees particularly lackluster, it’s difficult to justify them as your desired majors. Susan Heathfield, a career expert and writer of About.com’s Guide to Human Resources, suggests considering a degree in communications instead.
  • Information Systems (Unemployment Rate for Recent College Graduates 11.7 percent): "I'm not exactly sure what someone would do with [an information systems] degree in the current world," Heathfield says. "In the early days, the roles of various programmers, software developers, and network administrators were more distinct, but not anymore. Now the degree to have is computer science or computer engineering."
  • Architecture (Unemployment Rate for Recent College Graduates 13.9 percent): Thanks to the massive hit the housing and commercial real estate industries took in the past decade, architecture has highest unemployment rate among the degrees examined. If you’re interested in the process of planning and designing, engineering might be a more lucrative option.

What are your thoughts on the majors that made the list? Do you agree that they should be avoided at all costs or should students be encouraged to pursue their passion regardless of potentially high employment rates? Let us know in the comments section.

Comments

How to Switch Your Major

February 19, 2013

How to Switch Your Major

by Carly Gerber

Choosing a major is quite possibly one of the hardest decisions to make in college. We all have our different stories of how we chose our major – many of my friends chose their major because it was the easiest college to get into at the university while others selected their major because their parents thought the field would yield the most opportunities after college – but what happens when you want to switch majors?

I’ve switched majors three times so I know the situation can be stressful. If you’re no longer enjoying your original major, the idea of attending another class in that field may feel like it’s going to send you over the edge but keep calm. First things first: What’s your new dream major? Only you know what interests you so don’t let others influence your decision. Once you’ve answered this question, do all the research you can to learn how to get into the program. Some universities make you apply to each college while others let you freely move from college to college. Each university is different so be sure to meet with an adviser if you have any questions.

Next, start the transfer process. Hopefully you do get into the college of you dreams but if you don’t, I promise the world won’t end! Life’s setbacks can open many new doors but I would highly suggest not continuing to major in something that doesn’t interest you – you’re the one who will have to attend those classes...not your friend, your aunt or your mom. This may also be your time to reconsider college in general...maybe you don’t just want to switch majors but transfer universities entirely!

Finding the right major is about knowing what you will enjoy and knowing what you can use later on. That leaves every major known to mankind as a possibly!

Carly Gerber is majoring in journalism at Columbia College Chicago. She loves fashion and hopes to cover the topic for a Chicago-area magazine. In her free time, she focuses on her blog, loves making jewelry and spending time on Pinterest and Pose. She hopes to use this blog to guide and relate to its followers: college students like herself!

Comments

Deciding to Double Major or Minor

February 21, 2013

Deciding to Double Major or Minor

by Katlyn Clark

Going to college is a huge decision to make but choosing a major can be an even harder choice! You may seem a bit confused about what to major in but whatever you do, I have always heard not to remain “Undecided” for too long. Go ahead and major in a subject that catches your interest...but what happens if you cannot decide between two majors? Double up!

College students have the option to double major or add a minor to their course of study. I knew that when I decided to major in communication studies with a concentration in journalism that I wanted to minor in marketing as well: It gives me sort of a back-up plan if journalism does not work out for me. I also have a greater chance to combine my two majors in my future career since they relate to each other.

The perks of double majoring are enticing but the additional credit requirements could alter your progress toward graduation. I know several students with double majors and minors and though this decision may translate into a later graduation date, they chose this path because they wanted to pursue all fields they are passionate about.

As I was selecting the college I would eventually attend, I told my parents that I was going to pick up a minor in addition to my major field of study. If this sounds like your plan, check with the colleges you’re considering to see if you have the opportunity to double major or pursue a minor along with your major of choice. It will be helpful in the long run!

Katlyn Clark is a freshman at Campbell University majoring in journalism and minoring in marketing. She hopes to become a broadcast journalist for entertainment or write for a magazine such as People or Seventeen. In her spare time, Katlyn loves to hang out with friends and family and watch sports; she is a Christian who is so thankful for God’s many blessings in her life. Katlyn is from Elizabeth City, North Carolina and loves Tim Tebow, Pinterest, the WWE and cats.

Comments

Top Majors for College Class of 2014 Announced

April 23, 2014

by Suada Kolovic

If you're struggling to come up with ideas for possible majors and post-collegiate careers, looking at majors that are sought after may not be a bad place to start. According to a survey conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), organizations are most interested in hiring new college graduates with bachelor's degrees in the business, engineering and computer science fields. Nearly 70 percent of the organizations participating in NACE's Job Outlook 2014 survey said they plan to hire business majors and 43 percent said they plan to hire more grads during the fall of 2014 than they did just last year. Here are the top six degrees according to NACE’s findings:

Through the Job Outlook survey, NACE surveys its employer members each year about their hiring plans in order to project the job market for new college graduates. What do you think of the majors that made the list? Any surprises?

Comments

The Digital Textbook Divide

April 15, 2013

The Digital Textbook Divide

by Mike Sheffey

Online and digital textbooks are a growing resource for college students. They can be cheap, interactive, fun and sometimes more useful than their traditional predecessors. And now there is a surge of technology for professors to use as well, including ways to digitally check if their students are reading the assigned material.

I personally have only used digital textbooks as accompaniments to hardcover books but the concept of an entirely digital book is enticing. Only having to carry around a tablet or laptop is a great thing for students burdened by long walks across campus with clunky book bags. But when I’m assigned a reading, I assume that the teacher trusts that I’ll do it – not that I necessarily have to but because it will benefit me in the long run. I think that checking via software forces students to do something that a good student would already do. And I think that most college students aren't attending college to NOT do their assignments; it’s not a cheap investment to just sit around!

Honor codes at most colleges deal with assignments, cheating, etc. The idea is great but its execution comes across a bit untrusting from professors. It may also not be the best way to keep tabs on student learning. For some, this kind of checking could benefit them but students have their own unique study methods and could do poorly on the online checks but still ace tests. Programs like CourseSmart (one of the online data collecting programs) could be useful to chart progress overall but to place grades or too much merit in the technology conveys a message to students that professors don’t trust their commitment to coursework. People learn different ways and should be given the opportunity to study, read and work the way that is best for them.

Overall, the idea of digital textbooks is a great one if used properly: as an additional resource and not a primary way of determining student learning. Other resources, quizzes and methods should be used as well to provide a balance in various learning styles. What has your experience with digital textbooks been?

Mike Sheffey is a junior at Wofford College double majoring in computer science and Spanish. He loves all things music and has recently taken up photography. Mike works for an on-campus sports broadcasting company as well as the music news blog PropertyOfZack.com. He hopes to use this blogging position to inform and assist others who are seeking the right college or those currently enrolled in college by providing advice on college life, both in general and specific to Wofford.

Comments

The Right Way to Register

April 19, 2013

The Right Way to Register

by Katlyn Clark

With the frenzy and excitement surrounding finals and end-of-the-year activities, it’s easy to forget that you still need to register for next semester’s classes! You may have received confusing emails telling you how to select your fall courses but before you start stressing, check out these tips for a quick and easy registration process.

  • Review a course catalog or program evaluation. This method could help you with finding out what classes to take for your major as well as general classes you must complete in order to graduate. At Campbell, there is a program evaluation where students can review their progress thus far and determine any courses they still need.
  • Select a variety. Be sure to include classes you need to take and WANT to take. You do not want to put too much on your plate, though, so choose a course load you know you will be able to manage.
  • Check with your adviser. Call, email or go to your adviser’s office to figure out your schedule. They know more than you do so utilize that knowledge to your advantage: I have an adviser who has bent over backward to make sure I get the classes I need.
  • Have a back-up plan. So there is that one class you really need and it is full – what do you do now? Find out who the professor is and talk to them; they could allow you to overenroll or may offer another suggestion of a class to take instead.
  • Coordinate with others. Talk with your friends or roommates about courses you all need and enroll together, if possible. This will make studying easy...and fun!

Good luck with registering for classes but hurry up – you don’t want to miss out on the ones you need most!

Katlyn Clark is a freshman at Campbell University majoring in journalism and minoring in marketing. She hopes to become a broadcast journalist for entertainment or write for a magazine such as People or Seventeen. In her spare time, Katlyn loves to hang out with friends and family and watch sports; she is a Christian who is so thankful for God’s many blessings in her life. Katlyn is from Elizabeth City, North Carolina and loves Tim Tebow, Pinterest, the WWE and cats.

Comments

How to Land a Job After Graduation

May 9, 2013

How to Land a Job After Graduation

by Carly Gerber

Trying to find a job after graduation may seem grim but there are ways to better your chances. Here are a few helpful tips that any student (even you grads!) can use to get a job.

All in all, there are many ways to increase your chances of landing a job after graduation. If you are driven and use all the resources that are available to you, you’ll be employed sooner than you think!

Carly Gerber is majoring in journalism at Columbia College Chicago. She loves fashion and hopes to cover the topic for a Chicago-area magazine. In her free time, she focuses on her blog, loves making jewelry and spending time on Pinterest and Pose. She hopes to use this blog to guide and relate to its followers: college students like herself!

Comments

Is the Four-Year Plan Making Us Feel Guilty?

June 4, 2013

Is the Four-Year Plan Making Us Feel Guilty?

by Carly Gerber

According to the Buffalo News, there has been a decrease in the amount of students who receive their undergraduate degree in four years. Fewer than half of the University at Buffalo graduates graduated in four years and many other universities have seen the same decrease in their students graduating in that once-traditional timeframe. For example, Niagara University had only 60 percent of its students graduate in four years, while Alfred University only had 43 percent of its graduates graduate in four years. These statistics aren’t just exclusive to New York State, either: I personally know students from all over who have taken an extra semester or two to graduate.

My circumstances of being a transfer student and a student who has changed her major more times than she can count have caused me to extend my stay at college by a few semesters. Initially, I felt guilt, regret, sadness and self-loathing for needing to spend extra time at college; however, I wanted to feel excited for the future and those negative emotions were only going to hold me back from my full potential. Now, I’m feeling excitement, urgency and passion to take my college career seriously and to become a proud and successful graduate. I feel more mature and wiser because of my setbacks and changes during my time at college.

Carly Gerber is majoring in journalism at Columbia College Chicago. She loves fashion and hopes to cover the topic for a Chicago-area magazine. In her free time, she focuses on her blog, loves making jewelry and spending time on Pinterest and Pose. She hopes to use this blog to guide and relate to its followers: college students like herself!

Comments

Recent Posts

Tags

ACT (19)
Advanced Placement (24)
Alumni (17)
Applications (80)
Athletics (17)
Back To School (73)
Books (66)
Campus Life (454)
Career (115)
Choosing A College (51)
College (990)
College Admissions (238)
College And Society (297)
College And The Economy (371)
College Applications (144)
College Benefits (289)
College Budgets (214)
College Classes (444)
College Costs (488)
College Culture (589)
College Goals (386)
College Grants (53)
College In Congress (88)
College Life (555)
College Majors (220)
College News (577)
College Prep (166)
College Savings Accounts (19)
College Scholarships (157)
College Search (115)
College Students (442)
College Tips (113)
Community College (59)
Community Service (40)
Community Service Scholarships (26)
Course Enrollment (19)
Economy (119)
Education (26)
Education Study (29)
Employment (41)
Essay Scholarship (38)
FAFSA (55)
Federal Aid (99)
Finances (70)
Financial Aid (413)
Financial Aid Information (57)
Financial Aid News (56)
Financial Tips (40)
Food (44)
Food/Cooking (27)
GPA (80)
Grades (91)
Graduate School (56)
Graduate Student Scholarships (20)
Graduate Students (65)
Graduation Rates (38)
Grants (62)
Health (38)
High School (130)
High School News (71)
High School Student Scholarships (182)
High School Students (307)
Higher Education (110)
Internships (526)
Job Search (177)
Just For Fun (114)
Loan Repayment (39)
Loans (47)
Military (16)
Money Management (134)
Online College (20)
Pell Grant (28)
President Obama (24)
Private Colleges (34)
Private Loans (19)
Roommates (100)
SAT (22)
Scholarship Applications (162)
Scholarship Information (178)
Scholarship Of The Week (269)
Scholarship Search (217)
Scholarship Tips (86)
Scholarships (402)
Sports (62)
Sports Scholarships (21)
Stafford Loans (24)
Standardized Testing (45)
State Colleges (42)
State News (33)
Student Debt (83)
Student Life (510)
Student Loans (139)
Study Abroad (67)
Study Skills (215)
Teachers (94)
Technology (111)
Tips (505)
Transfer Scholarship (16)
Tuition (93)
Undergraduate Scholarships (35)
Undergraduate Students (154)
Volunteer (45)
Work And College (83)
Work Study (20)
Writing Scholarship (18)

Categories

529 Plan (2)
Back To School (357)
College And The Economy (510)
College Applications (249)
College Budgets (341)
College Classes (564)
College Costs (746)
College Culture (926)
College Grants (133)
College In Congress (132)
College Life (946)
College Majors (330)
College News (904)
College Savings Accounts (57)
College Search (389)
Coverdell (1)
FAFSA (116)
Federal Aid (132)
Fellowships (23)
Financial Aid (703)
Food/Cooking (76)
GPA (277)
Graduate School (107)
Grants (72)
High School (536)
High School News (256)
Housing (172)
Internships (565)
Just For Fun (222)
Press Releases (1)
Roommates (138)
Scholarship Applications (221)
Scholarship Of The Week (345)
Scholarships (594)
Sports (74)
Standardized Testing (58)
Student Loans (225)
Study Abroad (61)
Tips (828)
Uncategorized (7)
Virtual Intern (532)

Archives

< Mar April 2015 May >
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
2930311234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293012
3456789

<< < 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
Page 22 of 22