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Maximize Your College Experience Through Campus Events

Apr 4, 2013

by Katlyn Clark

Your time in college will include getting an education, making friends and enjoying your newfound freedom. Want to maximize all three of those aspects at the same time? Just take part in some of the fun campus events that colleges provide!

So why should you attend events on campus? You get to become more involved at your school and, if you’re interested, even join the host committee. I am on the Homecoming/Spring Fling Committee and I had so much fun planning and working on its activities: Just this week, we welcomed “American Idol” winner Phillip Phillips to Campbell for a concert! Campbell also has a group on campus called the Campus Activity Board which organizes the most exciting events for students to attend. They recently held a campus-wide Easter egg hunt where students looked for eggs throughout the day to win prizes. Attending campus events may even give you a leg up academically: Depending on the event, professors may reward students with extra credit for their attendance. (We call these events “luncheon learns” at Campbell.)

My philosophy is to attend as many events and activities as possible because you’re able to have fun with your friends, meet new people and sometimes obtain some free school swag. (I have so many Campbell free t-shirts just in my first year that I don’t have to worry about buying more apparel from the bookstore!) Even the time leading up to the event is fun: For the Phillip Phillips concert, many students stood in line for tickets and the camaraderie we shared as we waited is one of my favorite college memories to date. We got great seats for this sold-out event, too!

Whether you’re after a free t-shirt, extra credit, front row concert seats or a memorable experience, make sure to take advantage of all the events your campus has to offer. What events have you attended at your school?

Katlyn Clark is a freshman at Campbell University majoring in journalism and minoring in marketing. She hopes to become a broadcast journalist for entertainment or write for a magazine such as People or Seventeen. In her spare time, Katlyn loves to hang out with friends and family and watch sports; she is a Christian who is so thankful for God’s many blessings in her life. Katlyn is from Elizabeth City, North Carolina and loves Tim Tebow, Pinterest, the WWE and cats.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Report: 284,000 College Graduates Held Minimum-Wage Jobs in 2012

Apr 2, 2013

by Suada Kolovic

Looking for a competitive edge when applying for that minimum-wage barista position at your local coffee shop? Turns out your newly minted bachelor’s degree might just be the edge they’re looking for.

According to the U.S. Labor Department, there were about 284,000 college graduates working minimum-wage jobs in 2012, including 37,000 with advanced degrees. Surprisingly, that’s down from 2010’s peak of 327,000 but up 70 percent from a decade earlier. And with many college graduates saddled with crippling student loan debt, it’s no wonder they’re accepting positions that are low-paying and low-skilled.

Of the 41.7 million working 2010 college graduates, about 48 percent work jobs that require less than a bachelor’s degree and 38 percent of those polled didn’t even need a high school diploma. Why the surge of low-paying jobs? Three-fifths of the jobs lost during the recession that paid middle-income wages have been replaced with the low-wage variety, according to the National Employment Law Project. (For more on this report, click here.)

To our college student readers, does this report alter your perspective on getting a college education? Why or why not?

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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The Short & Tweet Scholarship Has Returned!

Earn $1,000 or a Kindle for College in 140 Characters or Fewer

Apr 1, 2013

by Scholarships.com Staff

For official rules, please click here.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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I’ve Got Spirit...How About You?

Supporting Athletics in College

Mar 15, 2013

by Katlyn Clark

Getting into college is very exciting and prospective and current students aren’t afraid to show their school spirit. How can you do the same? Try cheering on your school’s teams!

Why should students attend athletic events? Well, you get to cheer on your fellow classmates and represent your school, obviously! Some students go all out with body paint and have a crew to match up together. More of a casual fan? You can still attend, have a great time and possibly win free stuff like t-shirts or other fan merchandise to support the athletics program. If you go to a school that is well known in sports (like UNC Chapel Hill, which I root for during football and basketball seasons), you could even be featured on TV. Let your parents and friends at home know to watch or DVR the game you’ll be attending – this happened to me recently and it was cool to see myself on the big screen!

Campbell is not well known in sports but they do have a good athletic program and it’s growing every year. We just got a women’s lacrosse team and since I know some fellow classmates who play, I went to cheer on my friends. I had NO IDEA about the game before that day but it was an interesting and exciting experience to share with other students who were also trying to learn about the game. For some students, going to athletic events and not knowing anything about a sport can be a good thing: I for one am excited to attend more lacrosse games as the season progresses to see what else I can learn!

While there are other ways to show your support for your school, attending an athletic event is among the most enjoyable ones. Try it!

Katlyn Clark is a freshman at Campbell University majoring in journalism and minoring in marketing. She hopes to become a broadcast journalist for entertainment or write for a magazine such as People or Seventeen. In her spare time, Katlyn loves to hang out with friends and family and watch sports; she is a Christian who is so thankful for God’s many blessings in her life. Katlyn is from Elizabeth City, North Carolina and loves Tim Tebow, Pinterest, the WWE and cats.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Important Tips for Staying Organized

Mar 14, 2013

by Chelsea Slaughter

Whether you are applying to or already attending college, organization is key to staying on the right track. It’s always important to keep up with important files and papers concerning your academic path but how helpful is that if you cannot find what you need when you need it? Organizing can be simple and easy if you know how to do it!

The first thing you must do is get the right supplies and binders, dividers, labels and pocket folders are always a great start. For high school seniors, keeping a binder of all required paperwork will help you stay focused on graduation goals and college application necessities. SAT/ACT scores, college entrance essays, scholarship applications and student transcripts can all be properly filed for easy access, making the application process quick and simple.

Keep this process up in college. Make sure you obtain and file away copies of everything from the school, your adviser, etc., just in case of an unfortunate mishap. (Technology is great but not foolproof!) A binder with dividers works here as well but if you don’t have three-hole puncher, pocket folders will do. You may need to refer back to these college documents and it’s easier when you know exactly where to look.

These rules also apply to your studies! Even when a neatly organized binder isn’t required on the syllabus, it should be considered anyway. Date all of your notes, tests, quizzes, essays and assignments – this makes filing much easier and when you need to remove something, you will always know where to put it back. Organizing your classwork, notes and grades will help you focus on your progress and meet your goals.

These tips may be seem repetitive but they really do make a difference! Student life can get so hectic and without proper organization, it’s easy to lose track of what’s important.

Chelsea Slaughter is currently a junior at Jacksonville State University majoring in communications (public relations concentration) and minoring in art. She serves as a resident assistant on campus, is the treasurer in the Public Relations Organization and is an active member in W.I.S.E., NAACP and Omicron Delta Kappa Honors Leadership Society. She aims to work in the entertainment industry post-graduation and is well on her way thanks to an internship with a digital marketer to several music artists. Chelsea strives to achieve all of her goals and motivate others along the way.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Balancing School, Work and Your Personal Interests

Mar 12, 2013

by Mike Sheffey

So I went to a punk and pop punk music show this past Friday in Greensboro, NC and that got me thinking: College is a challenge but you’ve got to make time for the things you truly value. (For me, that’s music.) It’s takes some effort to keep doing the things you love when you have three tests to study for, an essay to write, a job to keep up with and extracurricular activities, but I think that keeping up with your passions is a great way to stay grounded in this hectic yet exciting time in your life.

Don’t get me wrong – immerse yourself in the culture of your campus, get involved on and off campus, and look into all that your college town has to offer (trust me, I’ve been searching for a music scene here) but don’t lose sight of those things that make you different from others. I can count the amount of punk music lovers at Wofford on one hand but I don’t let that stop me from practicing guitar, going to shows here and in my hometown and keeping up with the news of the scene.

Don’t be afraid to stand out, stay true to what you love and embrace the fact that you add a certain level of diversity and variety to your campus. Everyone has a hobby, a love or something that makes them different. Realize that it’s something that could benefit your campus as a whole: Get involved with clubs of similar interests and better your campus by pushing for what you care about and bring attention to it. Sometimes people won’t know they like something nor have similar interests until it’s laid out in front of them. Even if that something is far from your major, is just a hobby or is just a fun fact about yourself, share it with your campus. You’re part of the community and people want to hear it!

Mike Sheffey is a junior at Wofford College double majoring in computer science and Spanish. He loves all things music and has recently taken up photography. Mike works for an on-campus sports broadcasting company as well as the music news blog PropertyOfZack.com. He hopes to use this blogging position to inform and assist others who are seeking the right college or those currently enrolled in college by providing advice on college life, both in general and specific to Wofford.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Staying Healthy on Campus

Mar 6, 2013

by Chelsea Slaughter

The “freshman 15” is not a myth: It’s more of a warning because the “freshman 15” can easily escalate into the “freshman 20-40.” Adjusting to a new campus and a new meal plan can really have dramatic effect on your body...but only if you let it.

Most dining halls offer a plethora of choices. There's pizza, fries and burgers (oh my!) but consider reaching for smarter alternatives like salads, grilled chicken wraps and steamed vegetables. There is nothing wrong with indulging but just do it in moderation. It’s so easy to overeat when unlimited food is in your face every day – try to keep up balanced meals to help your body stay centered.

Being healthy is also about staying active. Check out your athletic center and see what it have to offer. Many campus gyms include cardio rooms with treadmills, ellipticals and stationary bikes; there are also rooms and equipment for weight training...and it’s all free of charge or already included in your campus fees! If you need a bit more motivation to work out, most campuses offer group exercise classes. (I personally enjoy step aerobics on Tuesdays and Thursdays and Zumba on Mondays and Wednesdays.)

The gym isn’t for everyone so remember that your small efforts add up. Walk to classes instead of driving or taking the shuttle. Toss the Frisbee around on the quad with your roommates or play basketball in the park. It’s not so much what you do, it’s that you do something!

Staying healthy does not have to be expensive or hard – it’s mainly about making smart choices. Don’t let that “freshman 15” sneak up on you!

Chelsea Slaughter is currently a junior at Jacksonville State University majoring in communications (public relations concentration) and minoring in art. She serves as a resident assistant on campus, is the treasurer in the Public Relations Organization and is an active member in W.I.S.E., NAACP and Omicron Delta Kappa Honors Leadership Society. She aims to work in the entertainment industry post-graduation and is well on her way thanks to an internship with a digital marketer to several music artists. Chelsea strives to achieve all of her goals and motivate others along the way.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Penn Admissions Officer Fired After Mocking Applicants on Facebook

Mar 6, 2013

by Suada Kolovic

Looking for an edge in the college admissions process? Sure...who isn’t? If you’re considering applying to some of the most competitive colleges in the country, you’ll need to find some way to distinguish yourself from the thousands of other hopefuls vying for a spot. Adding details of perseverance and overcoming adversity to your essay is a great place to start but be wary about what personal anecdotes you decide to share because you never know where your private story will end up: An admissions officer at the University of Pennsylvania was fired after she posted and openly ridiculed excerpts of students’ application essays on her Facebook page. Not cool.

Penn officials were made aware of the series of online posts written by Nadirah Farah Foley through a collection of Facebook screenshots anonymously sent to the dean of admissions. According to The Daily Pennsylvania, Foley included quotations from essays as well as disdainful remarks. In one excerpt, she quoted an essay in which an applicant had described the experience of overcoming his fear of using the bathroom outdoors while camping in the wilderness. “Another gem,” Foley wrote on the student’s topic choice. And although she is no longer working for the university, neither she nor her supervisors have officially confirmed that the postings were the reason for her departure. (For more on this story, click here.)

Do you think Foley breached Penn’s privacy policy even though she didn’t mention any students by name? What would you do if your essay was one of those Foley mocked? Let us know in the comments section.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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The Perks of Public Ivies

Mar 1, 2013

by Carly Gerber

Some of you may be striving to gain acceptance to an Ivy League school and that’s very admirable – they are some of the best schools in the world! – but there’s another group of universities that may interest you as well: the public ivies!

The Public Ivy League consists of the College of William & Mary, Miami University, the University of California (campuses as of 1985), the University of Michigan - Ann Arbor, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, UT Austin, the University of Vermont and UVa. These schools rival the eight Ivy League schools in academic excellence, attraction of superstar faculty, competition for the best and brightest students, appearance and rich history but with lower sticker prices. (If you live in a state where there is a public ivy, then the tuition price goes down even further.) Many of the public ivies are regularly ranked among the top schools by U.S. News & World Report; their graduate programs in business, education, engineering, law and medicine are also highly ranked.

If you are an athlete, you may want to consider the public ivies because, unlike Ivy League schools, they award athletic-based scholarships. (Ivy League athletes may receive scholarships and financial aid, but not towards their athletic merit.) Plus, they participate in major athletic conferences – think the Big East, Big Ten, Big 12, ACC, SEC or Pac-12 – that put athletes’ skills on display at the national level and attract interest from professional teams, if that is your ultimate goal.

Public ivies are also great options for students who want the challenging academic environment of an Ivy League school but would prefer a larger campus. By choosing a public ivy, students have access to a more diverse student body, bigger course catalog and wider range of campus groups.

What are your thoughts on public ivies? High schoolers, will you be considering one or more of these schools in your college search? College students, if you attend one of these schools, we'd love to hear how you made your decision!

Carly Gerber is majoring in journalism at Columbia College Chicago. She loves fashion and hopes to cover the topic for a Chicago-area magazine. In her free time, she focuses on her blog, loves making jewelry and spending time on Pinterest and Pose. She hopes to use this blog to guide and relate to its followers: college students like herself!

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Student Social Media Etiquette

Feb 27, 2013

by Chelsea Slaughter

Social media gives us what we feel like is a platform to express our thoughts and feelings on any issue around us. We can connect to people we know (or may not know) globally with ease but we must be cautious about what we say and what we post on these open sites. Your platform for free speech can either help or harm you.

If you check Scholarships.com’s blog regularly, you read a post about a college student who was expelled because of what he posted on Facebook. A lot of students may think “Wow, that’s crazy. That could never happen to me.” But in fact, it can! When posting on your favorite sites, keep these dos and don’ts in mind:

  • DO try and connect to people you may not have a chance to meet sans social media. (i.e., people you look up to, international students, etc.)
  • DON’T post anything you would not want your parents, professors or employers to see. These days, employers and college officials will often use social media as an extension of your resume to give them a better idea of who you are as a person.
  • DO keep a clean, PG profile. Untag yourself in any compromising posts or photos.
  • DON’T assume that since your page is private, it cannot be seen. There are plenty of ways to bypass such “protection” that you may not be aware of.
  • DO separate yourself from situations that could involve drama or negativity.
  • DON’T say anything about someone or something that you would not say in front of them. One of the main causes of lost friendships and peer conflicts is based off of social media.

Your social media accounts are a direct representation of you. Make sure the image presented is one you can be proud to call yours!

Chelsea Slaughter is currently a junior at Jacksonville State University majoring in communications (public relations concentration) and minoring in art. She serves as a resident assistant on campus, is the treasurer in the Public Relations Organization and is an active member in W.I.S.E., NAACP and Omicron Delta Kappa Honors Leadership Society. She aims to work in the entertainment industry post-graduation and is well on her way thanks to an internship with a digital marketer to several music artists. Chelsea strives to achieve all of her goals and motivate others along the way.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Shh...Harvard’s Elite Are Sleeping

This Ivy League School Considers Adding a Nap Room for Students

Feb 26, 2013

by Suada Kolovic

We’ve all been there: Going about our day as if we don’t have a care in the world when it dawns on us that (go figure) that term paper on the pros and cons of procrastination in the creative process is due tomorrow. Panicked, we consider emailing our professor an excuse about a death in the family but given we killed off Nana (who’s actually alive and well back home) last semester during finals week, we decide it’s best to pull an all-nighter. The next day, we’re irritable, unmotivated and just plain sluggish and while the simple solution is to overcome procrastination and not leave an assignment until the last minute, a Harvard student has suggested a different approach: a nap room on campus.

The Harvard administration is considering creating a designated nap room after sophomore Yugi Hou started an online petition. “Most students operate daily on a sleep deficit, to the detriment of their health and productivity,” said Hou. “For those getting insufficient sleep at night, naps can provide alertness and help students take a break from their hectic schedules.” Hou started the online petition through the Harvard Undergraduate Council’s “We the Crimson” initiative, which is meant to foster direct dialogue between students and school administrators. Each month, the three petitions with the most votes are sent to the Dean of Harvard College for review. Harvard administrators have yet to make a decision on the initiative but Hou has said that until a siesta center is set up on campus, she plans on creating a “nap map” to help plot the best spots for students to nod off on campus.

If you’re a fan of napping between classes, do you think it’s your university’s responsibility to provide nap rooms for students? Let us know what you think in the comments section.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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