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Dealing with a Serious Illness at School

by Kayla Herrera

Summer typically has college students working, taking internships or heading home and those who stay on campus become a little more isolated, especially in a small town like Houghton, Michigan. So when a serious illness strikes, what do you do? I was fortunate to have my grandparents just across the canal but others are not as lucky.

It started for me about a month ago. I had pressure and pain in my upper middle abdomen and I was kept up that night by nausea. I thought it was just something I ate but when the pain worsened the next night, I went to the emergency room. They did an ultrasound, took blood tests, gave me a shot in my buttocks – the worst shot I've received in my entire life – and began a weeks-long waiting period. Until a doctor surmised I likely had GERD (aka acid reflux disease), I took meds at night to sleep and lost about 20 pounds because I could barely eat without feeling ill.

This experience was extremely difficult for me emotionally. Daily calls home helped but I had a hard time not eating the foods I wanted to eat. I was already on a restricted medical diet for phenylketonuria (PKU) so having to further limit my dining options definitely took a toll. Now that I’m finally on the mend, I’m getting my food intake back on track and readjusting to the real world slowly but surely. The good news is I am feeling positive – about my health and the upcoming school year.

If you find yourself in a situation like this, all you can do is try to stay calm. Dealing with an unexpected illness away from home is hard – especially a serious one like mine. Don't be afraid to go to the ER if you experience pain; if you can't drive, hail a cab, wake up a trusty friend or call an ambulance. As you’re waiting for your results, keep your mind off your illness by doing artsy projects, Skyping with friends and reading. Keeping busy helps keep the mind off the discomfort and I also found that taking short walks outside helped in more ways than one. Dealing with a health issue by yourself at school can be frightening but all we can do is take a breath and know that this too shall pass.

In addition to being a Scholarships.com virtual intern, Michigan Tech student Kayla Herrera is a media coordinator for the Michigan Tech Youth Programs, a writer for The Daily News in Iron Mountain, Mich., and a writer for Examiner.com. She love a tantalizing, action-packed video game and can't get enough of horror movies (Stephen King's books always have her in their grip, though she prefers the old over the new). Writing is what she has always done, and that is what she is here to do.


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Apple’s Impact on Higher Ed

Will It Flourish or Falter Without Steve Jobs?

August 26, 2011

Apple’s Impact on Higher Ed

by Alexis Mattera

You may be pro-PC or a Linux lover but you have to give Steve Jobs some credit for not only the projects he’s helped spearhead during his time at Apple but also the personal emphasis he’s put on higher education initiatives. Now that Jobs has resigned as Apple’s CEO, many are wondering if and how the company will keep its collegiate focus.

Apple has been involved in higher education since the company’s early days with what’s now called the University Executive Forum, an advisory panel of top college officials who get early looks at products and a chance to influence design. For example, prior to the iPod’s debut, several schools experimented with the devices and their feedback prompted Apple to create iTunesU, a free service designed to store and stream audio and video files for university courses. The company also offers many incentives to college students, like sizeable discounts on computers and bonus iTunes gift cards...but will it all continue?

Despite new CEO Tim Cook’s responsiveness to and interest in higher ed, some college officials are concerned about what a Jobs-less Apple may mean. (Perhaps they're remembering when Apple forced Jobs out in 1985 and the company paid less attention to colleges.) Do you share in these concerns or do you think the culture Jobs has fostered will withstand the test of time?


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Pew Reports Hispanic Students are Largest Minority Group in College

by Suada Kolovic

While some students are debating whether or not a college education is worth the cost, Hispanic students are enrolling and attending at an all-time high. According to a report released by the Pew Hispanic Center, a 24-percent spike in Hispanic college enrollment has made them the largest minority group of 18- to 24-year-olds on campuses across the country.

The main factor behind the enrollment surge: eligibility. More Hispanic adults were eligible to attend college than ever before – nearly 73 percent had finished high school – so where are they attending? For the most part, the growth stems from Hispanic enrollment at community colleges. The report states that young Hispanic students are enrolling in community colleges at a much greater rate than their peers. In 2010, one million Hispanic students enrolled at four-year institutions, compared with 800,000 at two-year colleges, and of all young Hispanic students attending college last October, 54 percent were at four-year colleges. But while enrollment rates among Hispanic students have increased over the years, college completion rates lag: Hispanics are still the least likely of any major ethnic group to complete college or earn a degree.

Hispanic students, what do you think of the study’s findings? Why do you think more students are entering college but not completing?


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Get Some School Spirit, Would You?

by Darci Miller

Here at the University of Miami, there’s an odd sort of lack of spirit. We all claim to bleed orange and green but when it comes down to it, few of us actually do. We bail on even our most well-known sports teams if they have a losing record. Getting people to go to campus events is like pulling teeth. A miniscule percentage of our student body votes in student government elections. Many students are content to forgo participation on campus for nights of partying on South Beach.

It kind of boggles my mind that such a passionate university could be so apathetic.

But then the NCAA scandal hit. In case you haven’t been reading the news or watching ESPN, Miami is currently embroiled in some serious stuff: Based on testimony and reports, one of our athletic department’s boosters was illegally paying off athletes for almost 10 years. Not only does it sully Miami’s name and reputation but it drags dozens of athletes (past, present and pro) through the mud.

Even though we ‘Canes often feel like a fairly fractured community, there was an impressive amount of unity in the aftermath. “IStandWithTheU” is perpetually trending on Twitter in Miami and there was recently a spirit day on campus. Hundreds of people wore orange in support of our school. It was truly amazing walking across campus and seeing waves of orange as far as the eye could see.

This event showed me that spirit can be shown in lots of different ways. Maybe joining a thousand different clubs is your thing...or maybe it’s not. For me, I like having some free time and it’s enough to throw myself into what I do and bleed orange and green all over my wardrobe.

No matter what your personality is, whether you’re loud and proud or more reserved, I sincerely hope you’re spirited about your school. It’s just more fun that way!

Darci Miller is a New Yorker studying journalism and sport administration at the University of Miami. When she’s not writing for the school newspaper, you can find her at the gym, either working or working out. She loves all ‘80s pop culture (the cheesier the better!), and glues herself to her TV when the Olympics are on. She dreams big, and believes the sky’s the limit!


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Webster U. Student Gets the Boot for Lacking Empathy

by Suada Kolovic

David Schwartz was a typical adult student returning to school to pursue a different passion. After years as a computer help desk technician, Schwartz decided to head back to Webster University to become a family counselor. While in the master’s degree program, he excelled in his course work, earning all A’s and only one C, according to a school transcript. So why was he abruptly dismissed from the program on March 14 after he received a “no credit” for failing to successfully complete a practicum? A lack of empathy.

Schwartz is suing Webster for up to $1 million in losses and at least $2 million in punitive damages. He claims that the university dismissed him unexpectedly instead of helping to improve his empathy in order to complete the field work required for graduating. And he’s not alone: According to the American Counseling Association code of ethics, which is posted on Webster’s website, counselor education programs are required to provide remedial support for students, such as an advisory committee. That wasn’t the case for Schwartz, who says he would have welcomed it. "I'm at an age now, at 44, where I'm committed to what I'm doing professionally," he said. "I'm more than willing to improve."

But that’s not the entire story. Schwartz claims that there’s an underlying factor to his abrupt dismissal. He also alleges that he was deemed a poor performer after he wrote an anonymous letter to the dean criticizing a professor’s teaching methods and a romantic relationship between said professor and an administrator. There’s a lot more to the story here.

Do you think that Schwartz’s dismissal was a direct response to his not-so-anonymous letter? Is it the school’s responsibility to notify students that they’re unfit for certain occupations or help them through their inadequacies? Let us know what you think.


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EcoKat: Kansas State University’s Eco-Friendly College Mascot

by Suada Kolovic

While the Going Green Initiative is catching on like wildfire among celebrities and the environmentally conscious, recycling doesn’t seem to be a top priority when it comes to the college lifestyle. Universities across the country have yet to seriously encourage eco-friendly habits but Kansas State University may have stumbled upon a quirky solution: EcoKat.

In an effort to teach students the importance of environmentalism, Kansas State has developed the mascot EcoKat, described as the “crusader of conservation and fanatic of fluorescents” here to “make sure K-State stays on the path to green.” Since their announcement, students haven’t really embraced the concept as much as they’ve openly mocked the super-hero type mascot on popular social networking sites such as Twitter. The Kansas City Star shared some of the tamer tweets: “#EcoKat makes me want to leave my porch light on 24hours and drive two blocks to the gas station for a pack of gum”; “In honor of #EcoKat, I will separate my plastics, glass and aluminum from one another... then put them in the trash anyways”; and “Pretty sure I have my halloween costume figured out this year. Thanks, #ecokat.”

You can’t really knock Kansas State for their attempt to get students to be more environmentally conscious but do you think EcoKat would make you go green? What do you think of the teased-haired, purple glove-wearing eco-enforcer?


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Clipping Coupons for College?

Groupon and NLU Offer Discount to Boost Student Interest

September 6, 2011

Clipping Coupons for College?

by Alexis Mattera

Whether you’re in the market for discounted feather extensions or oil changes, odds are pretty high there’s a Groupon for what you seek...but what about reduced-rate college tuition?

The Chicago Tribune reported National-Louis University is offering a Groupon today for 57-percent off a three-credit graduate-level introduction to teaching course at its Chicago campus. (Regular tuition for the course is $2,232 but Groupon will offer it for $950.) According to Groupon’s communications director Julie Mossler, this is the first time an academic university has used the website as an effort to boost student interest. "There are all kinds of factors in the K-12 world that are really discouraging teachers and people seeking teaching degrees," said Jocelyn Zivin, NLU’s vice president of marketing and communications. "We'd like (potential students) to understand what the realities are, whether you are committed to this profession...and see if you have what it takes."

Every little bit of tuition assistance does help these days but what do you think of NLU and Groupon’s deal? Is it something that you think other schools should consider offering as well?


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Welcome to Your College Dorm…err, Hotel Room

Students Head to Overbooked Colleges with Nowhere to Stay

September 12, 2011

Welcome to Your College Dorm…err, Hotel Room

by Suada Kolovic

Up until this point, you’ve done everything a college freshman is suppose to do before heading off to college. You’ve read every tip and advice column you could get your hands on. You filled out all the right paperwork, submitted all your fees on time and were excited to meet your new roommate. Move-in day was supposed to go off without a hitch but instead of being greeted by your school’s welcome wagon, you were directed to the nearest hotel. Wait, what?

Across the country, universities and colleges are dealing with more incoming freshmen and transfers than they can handle. And while the finger pointing was inevitable, a few factors played into the overcrowding: administrators’ ambitious over-admitting, poorly planned enrollment predictions and a down economy resulted in halted residence hall construction projects. But regardless of who’s to blame, the fact remains that overbooked students make up a sizable portion of the collegiate population.

Here are the five scenarios these undergraduates tend to face, according to USA Today:

  • They are put temporarily or permanently in hotels near their campus, coming and going via shuttle services.
  • They are offered vouchers and other perks in hopes of precipitating a move off campus.
  • They are focused to live in traditional double rooms with two or three more roommates.
  • They are placed in dorm lounges, study rooms and other converted campus facilities.
  • Some freshman are separated from their peers and moved into residence halls typically allotted to upperclassmen.

Are you or someone you know dealing with overbooking at your school? Share your story.


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Studies Suggest U. of Wisconsin Bias Against White and Asian Applicants

by Suada Kolovic

As a student, you’ve done everything in your power to put your best foot forward – you maintained a 3.0 GPA in high school, were vice president of the National Honors Society, played on a varsity sports team and constantly volunteered at your local library – but what if, regardless of all your efforts, what mattered most was your ethnicity? According to a report release by the Center for Equal Opportunity (CEO), that may have been just the case if you applied to the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

The CEO, an advocacy organization opposed to racial and ethnic preferences, has released a report accusing the University of Wisconsin at Madison of extreme bias based on race and ethnicity in its undergraduate and law school admissions. The center, which filed a lawsuit in order to obtain the admissions data, alleges that African Americans and Latinos were given preference over whites and Asians. The studies claim that the odds ratio favoring African Americans and Hispanics over whites was 576 to 1 and 504 to 1, respectively. For law school admissions, the racial discrimination was also severe: An African American applicant with grades and LSAT scores at the median for the group would have had a 7 out of 10 chance of admissions and an out-of-state Hispanic applicant had a 1 out of 3 chance, compared to an in-state Asian applicant (1 out of 6 chance) and an in-state white applicant (only a 1 out of 10 chance) with those same grades and scores.

Based on the findings, the CEO chairman Linda Chavez said, “This is the most severe undergraduate admissions discrimination that CEO has ever found in the dozens of studies it has published over the last 15 years. The studies show that literally hundreds of students applying as undergrads or to the law school are rejected in favor of students with lower test scores and grades, and the reason is that they have the wrong skin color or their parents came from the wrong countries.” For more on these studies, click here.


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Groupon-NLU Deal Doesn’t Guarantee Admission to Graduate Program

by Suada Kolovic

Last week, we shared Groupon’s “experimental” deal offered by National-Louis University which provided bargain hunters with the opportunity to purchase an introductory teaching course at a serious discount. A total of 18 students took advantage of the deal but hopefully they read the fine print: Purchasing the Groupon does not guarantee acceptance to the master’s program that the course is a part of. Whoops.

While the Groupon-toting students will take “Introduction to the Profession and the Craft of Teaching” for the discounted rate, they aren’t technically enrolled at the institution. Instead, each participant will be considered a “student-at-large,” said Nivine Megahed, NLU’s president. The students-at-large will get inside-the-class practicum experience early on in order to get the full effect of teaching prior to applying to the master’s program unlike their traditional counterparts, Megahed said. Often, when aspiring educators teach in a classroom for the first time, “they either love it, or they go running for the hills,” she added.

Once they’ve completed the course, at-large students who want to take part in the program will have to go through the traditional admissions process, which requires a passing grade on the Illinois Basic Skills test. If you bought the Groupon, would this be a deal breaker for you? Do you think NLU should have made such stipulations clear early on?


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