News Articles About Fafsa

 Three San Bernardino County women who have been accused of stealing $1 million in federal financial aid from Fullerton college, in California, have been arrested by the U.S. Justice Department and are charged with various counts of mail and wire fraud. The scheme involved enrolling hundreds of mainly non-existent students, successfully applying for grants and loans and pocketing the money.

3 Women Charged in $1M Student Financial Aid Fraud

July 2, 2019 11:07 AM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
Three San Bernardino County women who have been accused of stealing $1 million in federal financial aid from Fullerton college, in California, have been arrested by the U.S. Justice Department and
Despite the possibility of earning free money for college, some current and prospective college students do not complete the FAFSA - perhaps because the form is confusing and lengthy. Instagram influencers and college bloggers are stepping in and have teamed up with the U.S. Department of Education to encourage more students to fill out their FAFSA with the hashtag #ButFirstFAFSA.

Insta Influencers Involved with Student FAFSA?

February 12, 2019 4:04 PM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
Despite the possibility of earning free money for college, some current and prospective college students do not complete the FAFSA - perhaps because the form is "confusing and lengthy." Instagram
The U.S. Department of Education will offer a contract to a single loan servicer to manage its $1.2 trillion student loan portfolio, which contains over 43 million borrowers. Instead of keeping its current contract with four different services, the ED will award Navient, GreatNet or the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA) the contract. What exactly does this mean for borrowers?

Department of Education Seeking Single Loan Servicer

May 23, 2017 10:23 AM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
The U.S. Department of Education will offer a contract to a single loan servicer to manage its $1.2 trillion student loan portfolio, which contains over 43 million borrowers. Instead of keeping its
With a new year comes a new Congress under new-ish management. Republicans will control the Senate for the first time in eight years, while the House of Representative will have its largest Republican majority in since 1928. But what does any of that have to do with higher education? Here are five predictions, courtesy of The Chronicle of Higher Education:

What Colleges Can Expect from Congress in 2015

January 21, 2015
by Suada Kolovic
With a new year comes a new Congress under new-ish management. Republicans will control the Senate for the first time in eight years, while the House of Representative will have its largest
Though it's a day off from school and work, New Year's Day is also a day to get down to business. While you’re starting in on your New Year's resolutions, opening up a new calendar, and packing up the holiday decorations, there’s one more thing that college students and college-bound high school students should do each January. The Department of Education starts accepting the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (more commonly known as FAFSA) on January 1 each year. State application deadlines fall soon after—as early as February in some cases. So while you might not start classes until August or September, you want to start applying for financial aid as soon as the FAFSA is available each year.

The FAFSA: New Year Means New Application

January 6, 2015
by Alexis Mattera
Though it's a day off from school and work, New Year's Day is also a day to get down to business. While you’re starting in on your New Year's resolutions, opening up a new calendar, and packing up
Figuring out the bottom line when it comes to the cost of your college education is definitely stressful. With everything that goes into determining your financial aid package (your parents’ income, your earnings and your family’s net assets), it’s important to understand that merit aid (aid based on a student’s attributes like (academics, athletics, extracurriculars, etc.) is available to student regardless of their “need.” New federal rules are blurring the distinction between scholarships awarded on merit and grants awarded because of a student’s financial need – for instance, a growing number of colleges now award “need-based” aid to students from families earning six figures! – so we’ve compiled a few helpful tips to maximize your chances for merit aid and increase your overall financial aid package.

Five Tips for Maximizing Merit Aid

July 11, 2014
by Suada Kolovic
Figuring out the bottom line when it comes to the cost of your college education is definitely stressful. With everything that goes into determining your financial aid package (your parents’ income,
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