Skip Navigation Links

The Early Student Gets Admitted

Colleges See More Interest, Accept More Students Early

October 21, 2010

The Early Student Gets Admitted

by Alexis Mattera

Hiring managers and interviewers like to say “If you’re early, you’re on time and if you’re on time, you’re late” and over the course of the most recent recession, that motto has been unofficially adopted by admissions committees and prospective college students.

According to the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC)’s annual “State of College Admission” report, many colleges (private and public) have reported increased interest from applicants in applying early and a jump in the number of students admitted this way. The former remained relatively the same as over the last two years but the latter – 65 percent of schools accepting more early decision applicants compared to 43 percent just one year prior – is pretty remarkable. The same can be said about the growing gap between the admissions rates for early decision and regular applicants at the same institutions: Colleges with early decision admit about 55 percent of all applicants, but 70 percent of early decision applicants, though only 7 percent of applications received take advantage of the early decision option. Another facet of the NACAC report is the overwhelming popularity of applying online, up to 80 percent in 2009 from 68 percent in 2007.

Does this mean schools are becoming less selective and simply rewarding the early birds in their quests for the worm? Not entirely…and not at all for the Ivies. The top criteria remain grades, the strength of the high school curriculum and admissions test scores but what NACAC calls "demonstrated interest in enrolling" is also climbing those ranks. Does this info change how you plan to apply?

Comments

WISE Reinvents Senior Year

Independent Study Program Quells Boredom, Increases Motivation

November 3, 2010

WISE Reinvents Senior Year

by Alexis Mattera

Despite the numerous advancements in medicine, there is still no cure for a highly contagious disease plaguing high school seniors. Symptoms include excessive yawning, lack of concentration, procrastination, class skipping and a blasé attitude toward anything relating to education. Dun dun dunnnnn…it’s senioritis!

Fortunately, there’s a potential vaccination circulating which could quash most strains and keep seniors on track until graduation. It’s called WISE, or the Wise Individualized Senior Experience, and it’s been helping students not only stay focused but gain real-world experience while they’re still in high school for more than 30 years. Take Ralph Vasami, for example: He spent the majority of his senior year as a WISE participant interning at a weather forecasting company and though the self-described “ordinary student with ordinary ambitions” wasn’t even sure if he would attend college, his experience with WISE opened his eyes to the possibility. He went on to attend Lyndon State College and today, he is the CEO of the company he interned at, Universal Weather & Aviation Inc., which has 1,300 employees in 20 countries and $860 million in annual billings. Yeah. Wow.

WISE participants spend most of their days outside the classroom but many, like Vasami, report they are more motivated to learn than ever. Dave Marcus, the writer of this piece, was a classmate of Vasami’s in 1970s and was also a WISE participant when the program was in its pilot stage; he feels is one of the few education reforms that actually delivers what it promises and Marcus’ former classmates agree, saying they would have floundered in their college classes without the practical experiences they had during internships at museums, publishing houses and engineering firms the WISE program provided.

So seniors, think WISE will keep you on track for the remainder of your time in high school? If so, see if your school is one of the program’s partner schools. And if there are any former WISE participants in the audience, did the program have the same impact as it had on Vasami and Marcus?

Comments

GPA, SAT, and a Great Sense of Humor Walk into a Bar

November 12, 2010

GPA, SAT, and a Great Sense of Humor Walk into a Bar

by Suada Kolovic

When you envisioned what your college application process would be like, I’m sure you anticipated stress and anxiety but I doubt you expected a joke could get you in. This was the moment you were told to draw on your strengths and articulate every achievement – countless community service hours, stellar GPA, and the fact that you were senior class president. Every sentence would be so perfectly and meticulously thought-out that who you were just leapt right off the page. You prepared your answer on why you belonged at your dream college and pinpointed what you had to offer…until you opened the actual application and found a serious curveball.

In addition to common essay prompts, more and more institutions are jumping on the unconventional question bandwagon and are interested knowing not only in why students want to gain admission but just how creative they can be when challenged. Here are the far-from-average questions schools are asking this year:

California Institute of Technology

Caltech asks applicants to not overanalyze:

  • “What are three adjectives your friends would use to describe you?”
  • “Caltech students have long been known for their quirky sense of humor and creative pranks and for finding unusual ways to have fun. What is something that you find fun or humorous?”

University of Chicago

Each year the University of Chicago asks newly admitted and current students for essay topics:

  • “Dog and Cat. Coffee and Tea. Great Gatsby and Catcher in the Rye. Everyone knows there are two types of people in the world. What are they?”

Yale University

Yale asks applicants to write essays, plus answer the following questions in 25 words or less:

  • “If you could witness one moment in history, what would it be and why?”
  • “Recall a compliment you received that you especially value. What was it? From whom did it come?”

University of Dallas

Along with three conventional questions, including “What influenced you most to apply to the University of Dallas?” the school also asks:

  • “Tell us your favorite joke or humorous anecdote.”

Soon-to-be college applicants, what do you think of this technique? Are you a fan of the challenge or frustrated by the fact that not only are you expected to impress them with your achievements and extracurricular activities but now you’re expected to be witty, too?

Comments

Six is the Magic Number

Report Reveals Half of First-Time Students Finish School in Six Years

December 2, 2010

Six is the Magic Number

by Alexis Mattera

Theoretically, earning an undergraduate degree takes four years. But when you factor in internships, work and extraneous circumstances, getting a diploma or certification seldom happens within that timeframe. How long does it take? The U.S. Department of Education says six years…for just half of first-time students.

The DoE’s new report, "Persistence and Attainment of 2003-04 Beginning Postsecondary Students: After 6 Years," states that of students who entered higher education in 2003-4, about half had earned degrees or certificates by June 2009 – the breakdown is 9 percent certificates, 9 percent associate degrees and 31 percent bachelor's degrees – 15 percent were still enrolled and 36 percent had left higher education. The report further dissects trends among students who began their post-secondary education at public two-year schools and four-year colleges (both state and private) as well as whether these students stayed with their initial institution or transferred to and graduated from another school.

I was able to graduate from the same university I enrolled in as a freshman in four years but I had to sacrifice several things – studying abroad, working more, accepting additional internships – in order to do so. Graduates, does the report sound at all like your college experience? Current students, are you on track to finish school when you thought you would when you started? High school students, what are your plans for the next four (or more) years?

Comments

Win $10K in This Scholarship of the Week!

John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award Deadline Jan. 9th

December 6, 2010

Win $10K in This Scholarship of the Week!

by Suada Kolovic

The annual John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Essay Contest invites high school students from across the nation to write an original essay about an elected official who has demonstrated political courage. The contest is a companion program of the Profile in Courage Award, named for President Kennedy’s 1957 Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Profiles in Courage, which recounts the stories of eight senators, the obstacles they faced, and the special valor they demonstrated despite the risks.

Winning essayists will receive awards totaling up to $13,500. The first-place winner will be invited to accept the award at the Profile in Courage Award Ceremony hosted each May by Caroline Kennedy at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston.

For more information on this scholarship and other scholarship opportunities, conduct a free scholarship search today!

Comments

Mind the Gap

Should You Take a Year Off?

December 30, 2010

Mind the Gap

by Alexis Mattera

The road to college – once thought to be straight and narrow – is detouring into uncharted territory. It was once expected for all high school seniors to matriculate to an institute of higher education the semester after they graduate but today, many students (and their parents) are considering the notion of taking a year off from formal schooling first.

But what do students do during this time, often called a gap year? Not catching up on “Extreme Couponing” or trying out online dating: Students use this time to volunteer abroad or build their resumes and schools are adopting formal programs allowing incoming freshmen to defer admission for a year to do so. According to the Wall Street Journal, "gap fairs" are becoming just as common as campus job expos. The results? Mixed. While most students end their gap years better prepared to attend college, some get so waylaid that they abandon a collegiate education all together.

It may sound tempting to take a year off to explore the unknown but there are a few confounding variables. First, the price tag is far from alluring – unless you feel $35,000 is a reasonable figure. (The upside is that costs can be defrayed by stipends, grants, research fellowships and scholarships or the agreement to work in a very remote area.) Next, the hazy direction of your future. I won't deny that your late teens and early 20s are the best times to gain life experience but if said experience is going to leave you in debt or questioning once-important educational goals, is taking the time off worth it?

Comments

Courageous Persuaders Video Scholarship Competition

Deadline Approaching for the Scholarship of the Week

January 3, 2011

Courageous Persuaders Video Scholarship Competition

by Suada Kolovic

Are you an aspiring director or an up-and-coming YouTube star? Perhaps you’re just fascinated by movies and the process of making them. If you’ve got some spare time and access to recording equipment, then this week’s Scholarship of the Week may be right for you. Courageous Persuaders invites high school students to create a television commercial about the dangers of alcohol use. Students compete for scholarship money and trophies. The grand prize-winning commercial actually airs on TV as a public service announcement.

High school students attending a United States High School can participate; emphasis is placed on concept and the message, not on production values. For more information on this scholarship and other scholarship opportunities, conduct a free scholarship search today!

Comments

Top Majors for College Class of 2011 Announced

January 5, 2011

Top Majors for College Class of 2011 Announced

by Suada Kolovic

Unfortunately, only two winners walked away with the $355 Mega Millions jackpot and if you weren’t one of them, instant fame and fortune may not be in the cards for you, but a lucrative career that is in high demand could be four short years away. If you’re struggling to come up with ideas for possible majors and post-collegiate careers, looking at majors that are sought after may not be a bad place to start.

According to a survey conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), organizations are most interested in hiring new college graduates with bachelor’s degrees in the business, engineering and computer science fields. Nearly 62 percent of the organizations participating in NACE’s Job Outlook 2011 survey said they plan to hire accounting graduates, followed by finance (57 percent) and electrical engineering (53.5 percent). Here are the top six degrees according to NACE’s findings:

  1. Accounting
  2. Finance
  3. Electrical Engineering
  4. Mechanical Engineering
  5. Computer Science
  6. Business Administration/Management

Each year, through the Job Outlook survey, NACE surveys its employer members about their hiring plans in order to project the job market for new college graduates. Do you agree with this list? Let us know what you think.

Comments

Scholarship of the Week: STOP Hunger Scholarships

January 31, 2011

Scholarship of the Week: STOP Hunger Scholarships

by Suada Kolovic

The Sodexo Foundation seeks applicants for the STOP Hunger Scholarships to recognize students in the fight against hunger in America. More than 49 million Americans are at risk of hunger and Sodexo, Inc. is committed to working toward a hunger-free nation. The STOP Hunger Scholarships recognize and reward students who have made a significant impact in the fight against hunger and its root causes in the United States.

Each national STOP Hunger Scholarship recipient receives a $5,000 scholarship and a matching $5,000 donation to their affiliated hunger relief organization. Added consideration is given to those students working to combat childhood hunger.

Applications are available to students from kindergarten through graduate school. For more information on this scholarship and other scholarship opportunities, conduct a free scholarship search today!

Comments

Top Dos and Don’ts to Avoid the Winter Blues

January 17, 2011

Top Dos and Don’ts to Avoid the Winter Blues

by Suada Kolovic

With winter in full swing, it seems like the “winter blues” are upon us. Shorter days and colder nights culminate into millions of Americans suffering from mild depression, lack of motivation and low energy during this cold season which ironically is known as SAD or Seasonal Affective Disorder. But you’re in luck: Here are the top dos and don’ts to keep those blues at bay.

  • Do Exercise: Exercise is a great stress reliever and a great way to keep your spirits up. And during those cold winter nights, releasing those “feel good” endorphins is an ideal way to increase your energy throughout the day.
  • Don’t Oversleep: We’re all tempted to sleep in during the winter months for obvious reasons: there’s no sunlight when you wake up in the morning. But it’s essential to fight that urge to hit the snooze button for a 12-hour sleep session because you’re really doing more harm than good. Try to stay active and keep a schedule to avoid oversleeping.
  • Do Enjoy the Season: Sure, talking long walks in your neighborhood may not be an option in freezing temperatures, but that doesn’t mean you can’t embrace the season in other ways. Try something new like skiing and snowboarding or keep things simple and go sledding and ice-skating – after all, these options are only around for a limited time, so take advantage.
  • Don’t Keep your Room Dark: There’s a direct link to the “winter blues” and the lack of sunlight during the winter season and sulking in a dark environment will only exacerbate symptoms.

For even more tips, click here. And don’t forget to let us know what you’re doing to combat the winter blues.

Comments

Recent Posts

Tags

ACT (19)
Advanced Placement (24)
Alumni (16)
Applications (80)
Athletics (17)
Back To School (73)
Books (66)
Campus Life (454)
Career (115)
Choosing A College (51)
College (988)
College Admissions (238)
College And Society (296)
College And The Economy (371)
College Applications (144)
College Benefits (289)
College Budgets (214)
College Classes (444)
College Costs (488)
College Culture (587)
College Goals (386)
College Grants (53)
College In Congress (87)
College Life (554)
College Majors (220)
College News (575)
College Prep (166)
College Savings Accounts (19)
College Scholarships (156)
College Search (115)
College Students (440)
College Tips (113)
Community College (59)
Community Service (40)
Community Service Scholarships (26)
Course Enrollment (19)
Economy (119)
Education (26)
Education Study (29)
Employment (41)
Essay Scholarship (38)
FAFSA (55)
Federal Aid (99)
Finances (70)
Financial Aid (412)
Financial Aid Information (57)
Financial Aid News (56)
Financial Tips (40)
Food (44)
Food/Cooking (27)
GPA (80)
Grades (91)
Graduate School (56)
Graduate Student Scholarships (20)
Graduate Students (65)
Graduation Rates (38)
Grants (62)
Health (38)
High School (130)
High School News (71)
High School Student Scholarships (181)
High School Students (306)
Higher Education (110)
Internships (526)
Job Search (177)
Just For Fun (113)
Loan Repayment (39)
Loans (47)
Military (16)
Money Management (134)
Online College (20)
Pell Grant (28)
President Obama (24)
Private Colleges (34)
Private Loans (19)
Roommates (100)
SAT (22)
Scholarship Applications (162)
Scholarship Information (177)
Scholarship Of The Week (268)
Scholarship Search (216)
Scholarship Tips (86)
Scholarships (401)
Sports (62)
Sports Scholarships (21)
Stafford Loans (24)
Standardized Testing (45)
State Colleges (42)
State News (33)
Student Debt (83)
Student Life (510)
Student Loans (139)
Study Abroad (67)
Study Skills (215)
Teachers (94)
Technology (111)
Tips (505)
Transfer Scholarship (16)
Tuition (93)
Undergraduate Scholarships (35)
Undergraduate Students (154)
Volunteer (45)
Work And College (83)
Work Study (20)
Writing Scholarship (18)

Categories

529 Plan (2)
Back To School (357)
College And The Economy (510)
College Applications (249)
College Budgets (341)
College Classes (564)
College Costs (746)
College Culture (925)
College Grants (133)
College In Congress (131)
College Life (944)
College Majors (330)
College News (902)
College Savings Accounts (57)
College Search (389)
Coverdell (1)
FAFSA (116)
Federal Aid (132)
Fellowships (23)
Financial Aid (702)
Food/Cooking (76)
GPA (277)
Graduate School (107)
Grants (72)
High School (535)
High School News (255)
Housing (172)
Internships (565)
Just For Fun (221)
Press Releases (1)
Roommates (138)
Scholarship Applications (220)
Scholarship Of The Week (344)
Scholarships (593)
Sports (74)
Standardized Testing (58)
Student Loans (225)
Study Abroad (61)
Tips (827)
Uncategorized (7)
Virtual Intern (532)

Archives

< Feb March 2015 Apr >
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
22232425262728
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930311234

<< < 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17  > >>
Page 13 of 31