News Articles About Student Life


Summer classes are great for getting ahead or catching back up if you’ve fallen behind. They aren’t for everyone, though, so when deciding on extra courses for the summer, keep these factors in mind:

Financial Aid: An important factor is whether or not you can financially afford to take summer classes. When I was a freshman, I was able to take two summer courses using a summer Pell grant but unfortunately, that option is no longer available. Summer financial aid is included in your fall/spring aid year so if you use your loan money in entirety during the fall and spring, then you may not have any left for summer classes. Check with your campus financial aid office to get the most current information and payment alternatives.

Class Location: You do not have to live near your university or stay on campus to take a summer class. You could take a course at a nearby university while living at home – just go to your admissions office to fill out the necessary paperwork to complete this. Online classes are also always an option; there may be a price difference between online and traditional in-person courses so be sure to check that before signing up.

Time Spent in Class: My university has a breakdown of three short semesters during the summer that last one month each. I took two “Maymester” classes and we were in class for almost three hours a day Monday through Thursday; I found this easy because the professors taught only the needed information without the extra projects that usually fill up a semester. Not all universities have this option so check with your advisers on the different summer class options.

Are Summer Classes Right for You?

April 29, 2013
by Chelsea Slaughter
Summer classes are great for getting ahead or catching back up if you’ve fallen behind. They aren’t for everyone, though, so when deciding on extra courses for the summer, keep these factors in

In terms of employment in college, on-campus jobs are the way to go. They get you that spending money you need while keeping you up to date with campus activities. In a way, they make you feel like a great contributor to the campus and its events.

Working Your Way Through College...and Enjoying It!

April 24, 2013
by Mike Sheffey
In terms of employment in college, on-campus jobs are the way to go. They get you that spending money you need while keeping you up to date with campus activities. In a way, they make you feel like

With the frenzy and excitement surrounding finals and end-of-the-year activities, it’s easy to forget that you still need to register for next semester’s classes! You may have received confusing emails telling you how to select your fall courses but before you start stressing, check out these tips for a quick and easy registration process.

Review a course catalog or program evaluation. This method could help you with finding out what classes to take for your major as well as general classes you must complete in order to graduate. At Campbell, there is a program evaluation where students can review their progress thus far and determine any courses they still need.

Select a variety. Be sure to include classes you need to take and WANT to take. You do not want to put too much on your plate, though, so choose a course load you know you will be able to manage.

Check with your adviser. Call, email or go to your adviser’s office to figure out your schedule. They know more than you do so utilize that knowledge to your advantage: I have an adviser who has bent over backward to make sure I get the classes I need.

Have a back-up plan. So there is that one class you really need and it is full – what do you do now? Find out who the professor is and talk to them; they could allow you to overenroll or may offer another suggestion of a class to take instead.

Coordinate with others. Talk with your friends or roommates about courses you all need and enroll together, if possible. This will make studying easy...and fun!

The Right Way to Register

April 19, 2013
by Katlyn Clark
With the frenzy and excitement surrounding finals and end-of-the-year activities, it’s easy to forget that you still need to register for next semester’s classes! You may have received confusing

Online and digital textbooks are a growing resource for college students. They can be cheap, interactive, fun and sometimes more useful than their traditional predecessors. And now there is a surge of technology for professors to use as well, including ways to digitally check if their students are reading the assigned material.

The Digital Textbook Divide

April 15, 2013
by Mike Sheffey
Online and digital textbooks are a growing resource for college students. They can be cheap, interactive, fun and sometimes more useful than their traditional predecessors. And now there is a surge

It’s finally April and summer is just around the corner but there is one thing holding us back from enjoying some time off...FINALS! They can seem so excruciating when all we can think about is going home, interning or studying abroad but here are some tips to help you get through this often dreaded time:

Manage your time. Confirm your finals schedule with your professors so you can prepare appropriately, ensuring you have enough time to both study and sleep. Input alerts on your computer and phone and set a few alarms the night before tests so you don’t oversleep.

Don’t stress. Don’t overwhelm yourself to the point that you feel miserable. Be calm, take some deep breaths and make sure you get plenty of rest. Try to end your day thinking about something other than your finals; if not, you may have a sleepless night and that will not help.

Treat yourself. If you aren’t one to study or find yourself having difficulty focusing, set a goal to reach a certain section of your material and then treat yourself. It could be to 30 minutes of watching TV or going online – meeting your goals deserves some credit and will help you return to your work refreshed.

Study groups. If you are able to study with others, form a study group. You may be able to learn more from your peers than you thought: I have studied with classmates before and it helped me A LOT when I took the final. I strongly suggest this method if you need help in a specific class because perhaps one of your study partners will explain the course information in a way that’s easier to understand and retain.

Your Guide to College Finals

April 12, 2013
by Katlyn Clark
It’s finally April and summer is just around the corner but there is one thing holding us back from enjoying some time off...FINALS! They can seem so excruciating when all we can think about is

Balancing relationships on campus can be a task. For new college students, the freedom can be quite overwhelming: Students are no longer under the microscope of their parents and can come and go and do as they please. As amazing as it sounds, however, it is key to remember the pros and cons of this autonomy.

Maintaining Healthy Relationships in College

April 9, 2013
by Chelsea Slaughter
Balancing relationships on campus can be a task. For new college students, the freedom can be quite overwhelming: Students are no longer under the microscope of their parents and can come and go

Your time in college will include getting an education, making friends and enjoying your newfound freedom. Want to maximize all three of those aspects at the same time? Just take part in some of the fun campus events that colleges provide!

Maximize Your College Experience Through Campus Events

April 4, 2013
by Katlyn Clark
Your time in college will include getting an education, making friends and enjoying your newfound freedom. Want to maximize all three of those aspects at the same time? Just take part in some of

The academic year is winding down – before you know it, it will be finals week and time for semester grades! – and this is a critical time to decide if you want to drop a class or stick it out to the end. If you’re on the fence about what to do, you must consider some critical points.

Deadlines: Check your school’s academic calendar to find out the different deadlines for withdrawing from classes. These dates will tell you the last day to withdraw and still receive a portion of tuition back, the last day to withdraw without academic penalty and the last day to withdraw passing.
Financial Aid: Before you drop a class, consider how many credit hours you are taking. You must be a full-time student to receive financial aid and if at any time during the semester you drop below the required amount of hours, you may have to pay that money back.
Grades: If you miss the right deadline to drop a class, you will receive an automatic F. If the reason you are dropping is because of your current grade, consider if there is anything you can do to bring it up. Failing a class can bring your GPA way down and if there is a way to avoid this, take it!

Classes: To Drop or To Keep?

April 3, 2013
by Chelsea Slaughter
The academic year is winding down – before you know it, it will be finals week and time for semester grades! – and this is a critical time to decide if you want to drop a class or stick it out to

We all know that school is hard sometimes but life after graduation can be much harder if you do not do what’s necessary to stand apart from the crowd. When graduating high school and entering college, you will find many opportunities to enter academic and social organizations, most of which will require application processes that ask about your involvement and leadership skills. Realizing you don’t have much on your resume? No worries: You still have time.

Building a Resume While in School

March 27, 2013
by Chelsea Slaughter
We all know that school is hard sometimes but life after graduation can be much harder if you do not do what’s necessary to stand apart from the crowd. When graduating high school and entering
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