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Easy Ways to Get Involved on Campus

March 8, 2013

Easy Ways to Get Involved on Campus

by Katlyn Clark

Regardless of your school’s size or location, there are many ways to get involved on campus. If you put yourself out there, you’ll meet students and faculty, discover new interests and find enjoyable ways to spend your time when you’re not in class or studying.

When I was looking at colleges, it was very important to me to explore the clubs and organizations each school offered. Campbell, for example, hosted an academic fair where all of the clubs had booths and were giving out information about their organizations. If your school does something like this, I highly recommend going: It’s a great opportunity to find where you belong. While at the fair, I saw that Campbell had a newspaper and, given my career path, I really wanted to join the staff; I now work there!

Another way to get involved is to attend your school’s sporting events. Cheering on your team can be a lot of fun and you’ll often make friends in the stands who share your school spirit and enthusiasm. If you like to play sports but just not at the collegiate level, start or join an intramural team: You’ll be able to play a sport you love with and against other students who care as much as you do.

If you like to keep grounded in your faith, there are campus ministry events. Many meet once a week and attending these events is an excellent way to surround yourself with others who share your beliefs.

Whether you do so by volunteering, playing a sport or worshiping in your faith, getting involved on campus is always a great idea. How do you get involved on your campus?

Katlyn Clark is a freshman at Campbell University majoring in journalism and minoring in marketing. She hopes to become a broadcast journalist for entertainment or write for a magazine such as People or Seventeen. In her spare time, Katlyn loves to hang out with friends and family and watch sports; she is a Christian who is so thankful for God’s many blessings in her life. Katlyn is from Elizabeth City, North Carolina and loves Tim Tebow, Pinterest, the WWE and cats.

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Your Group Project Survival Guide

March 11, 2013

Your Group Project Survival Guide

by Alexis Mattera

So you're in a group for a class project and not liking it one bit? Welcome to college.

The key to group projects is not about only about dividing the work - a successful group project has its members communicate well, often and without hassle...but what if you get unlucky and end up with a group member you can't deal with?

When dealing with a group member you don't connect with, put all feelings aside and just listen to them. Hear out every suggestion, question and even decode what they aren't saying. When replying, stick to the grandma rule: Would you give your grandma attitude, be sarcastic or complete ignore what she has to say? Of course not, so don't do that to a fellow student.

What if the situation is opposite and you have a group member who is not respecting you? Sit them down, look them in the eye and tell them what you think should been done with this project. (The grandma rule applies here as well.) If you get all worked up, the other person is most likely going to take the same route and that hardly ever turns out well.

If you’ve tried all of these tips and problems within the group persist, talk to your professor. If he/she can let you work by yourself, do it. It's better than getting a bad grade and having to work even harder for the rest of the class. Plus, you'll probably do a great job anyway!

Samuel “Samwell” Favela is a journalism major at Long Beach City College. He’s interested in all things media – he enjoys blogging, Instagramming and hosting his own campus radio show – and is always excited to meet new people. Samwell’s educational journey has already taken him from Pomona to Long Beach and shows no sign of slowing down...which is exactly the way he likes it!

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Balancing School, Work and Your Personal Interests

March 12, 2013

Balancing School, Work and Your Personal Interests

by Mike Sheffey

So I went to a punk and pop punk music show this past Friday in Greensboro, NC and that got me thinking: College is a challenge but you’ve got to make time for the things you truly value. (For me, that’s music.) It’s takes some effort to keep doing the things you love when you have three tests to study for, an essay to write, a job to keep up with and extracurricular activities, but I think that keeping up with your passions is a great way to stay grounded in this hectic yet exciting time in your life.

Don’t get me wrong – immerse yourself in the culture of your campus, get involved on and off campus, and look into all that your college town has to offer (trust me, I’ve been searching for a music scene here) but don’t lose sight of those things that make you different from others. I can count the amount of punk music lovers at Wofford on one hand but I don’t let that stop me from practicing guitar, going to shows here and in my hometown and keeping up with the news of the scene.

Don’t be afraid to stand out, stay true to what you love and embrace the fact that you add a certain level of diversity and variety to your campus. Everyone has a hobby, a love or something that makes them different. Realize that it’s something that could benefit your campus as a whole: Get involved with clubs of similar interests and better your campus by pushing for what you care about and bring attention to it. Sometimes people won’t know they like something nor have similar interests until it’s laid out in front of them. Even if that something is far from your major, is just a hobby or is just a fun fact about yourself, share it with your campus. You’re part of the community and people want to hear it!

Mike Sheffey is a junior at Wofford College double majoring in computer science and Spanish. He loves all things music and has recently taken up photography. Mike works for an on-campus sports broadcasting company as well as the music news blog PropertyOfZack.com. He hopes to use this blogging position to inform and assist others who are seeking the right college or those currently enrolled in college by providing advice on college life, both in general and specific to Wofford.

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SOTW: Beware the Jabberwock

This SOTW is Accepting Entries Through May 22nd

May 12, 2014

by Suada Kolovic

A Jabberwock, a Jubjub bird and a Bandersnatch...complete nonsense, right? Right. They are characters from "Jabberwocky" by Lewis Carroll. Made-up creatures, sure, but there is a story here. "Jabberwocky" is a tale of terrifying monsters, a daring hero, a ferocious battle, and a triumphant homecoming. To summarize: A boy is warned that there is a monster called a Jabberwock in the woods. He grabs his sword and searches for the dangerous beast. When the boy finally finds the Jabberwock, he slays him and returns home to tell his father of his accomplishment. His father is overjoyed.

Your challenge is to bring this drama to vivid life in a video, no longer than 2 minutes.

Your video must:

  • Depict the story using strong visuals. How you tell the story is up to you. You can act it out, stage it with sets and costumes, use animation, tell it using sign language, whatever you’d like.
  • Provide a clear recitation of the poem in full as included below (you do not need to show the reciter on screen).

For more information on this scholarship and other scholarship opportunities, conduct a free scholarship search today!

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Important Tips for Staying Organized

March 14, 2013

Important Tips for Staying Organized

by Chelsea Slaughter

Whether you are applying to or already attending college, organization is key to staying on the right track. It’s always important to keep up with important files and papers concerning your academic path but how helpful is that if you cannot find what you need when you need it? Organizing can be simple and easy if you know how to do it!

The first thing you must do is get the right supplies and binders, dividers, labels and pocket folders are always a great start. For high school seniors, keeping a binder of all required paperwork will help you stay focused on graduation goals and college application necessities. SAT/ACT scores, college entrance essays, scholarship applications and student transcripts can all be properly filed for easy access, making the application process quick and simple.

Keep this process up in college. Make sure you obtain and file away copies of everything from the school, your adviser, etc., just in case of an unfortunate mishap. (Technology is great but not foolproof!) A binder with dividers works here as well but if you don’t have three-hole puncher, pocket folders will do. You may need to refer back to these college documents and it’s easier when you know exactly where to look.

These rules also apply to your studies! Even when a neatly organized binder isn’t required on the syllabus, it should be considered anyway. Date all of your notes, tests, quizzes, essays and assignments – this makes filing much easier and when you need to remove something, you will always know where to put it back. Organizing your classwork, notes and grades will help you focus on your progress and meet your goals.

These tips may be seem repetitive but they really do make a difference! Student life can get so hectic and without proper organization, it’s easy to lose track of what’s important.

Chelsea Slaughter is currently a junior at Jacksonville State University majoring in communications (public relations concentration) and minoring in art. She serves as a resident assistant on campus, is the treasurer in the Public Relations Organization and is an active member in W.I.S.E., NAACP and Omicron Delta Kappa Honors Leadership Society. She aims to work in the entertainment industry post-graduation and is well on her way thanks to an internship with a digital marketer to several music artists. Chelsea strives to achieve all of her goals and motivate others along the way.

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I’ve Got Spirit...How About You?

Supporting Athletics in College

March 15, 2013

I’ve Got Spirit...How About You?

by Katlyn Clark

Getting into college is very exciting and prospective and current students aren’t afraid to show their school spirit. How can you do the same? Try cheering on your school’s teams!

Why should students attend athletic events? Well, you get to cheer on your fellow classmates and represent your school, obviously! Some students go all out with body paint and have a crew to match up together. More of a casual fan? You can still attend, have a great time and possibly win free stuff like t-shirts or other fan merchandise to support the athletics program. If you go to a school that is well known in sports (like UNC Chapel Hill, which I root for during football and basketball seasons), you could even be featured on TV. Let your parents and friends at home know to watch or DVR the game you’ll be attending – this happened to me recently and it was cool to see myself on the big screen!

Campbell is not well known in sports but they do have a good athletic program and it’s growing every year. We just got a women’s lacrosse team and since I know some fellow classmates who play, I went to cheer on my friends. I had NO IDEA about the game before that day but it was an interesting and exciting experience to share with other students who were also trying to learn about the game. For some students, going to athletic events and not knowing anything about a sport can be a good thing: I for one am excited to attend more lacrosse games as the season progresses to see what else I can learn!

While there are other ways to show your support for your school, attending an athletic event is among the most enjoyable ones. Try it!

Katlyn Clark is a freshman at Campbell University majoring in journalism and minoring in marketing. She hopes to become a broadcast journalist for entertainment or write for a magazine such as People or Seventeen. In her spare time, Katlyn loves to hang out with friends and family and watch sports; she is a Christian who is so thankful for God’s many blessings in her life. Katlyn is from Elizabeth City, North Carolina and loves Tim Tebow, Pinterest, the WWE and cats.

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Determining Your Friends from Your "Friends"

March 18, 2013

Determining Your Friends from Your "Friends"

by Mike Sheffey

Ah, the post-high school Facebook dilemma. We’ve all had it: These are people that you’ve known for a long time or could be people you grew up with but now you just don’t want to see the sixteenth picture of their cat or their statuses that no longer interest you in any way. What do you do?

If used properly, Facebook is a fantastic networking tool. Your “friends” could someday be job opportunities – after all, it’s who you know that gets you far! – so if they’re someone of future interest, stay connected. If they have potential but have a habit of posting things you just don’t need to see, however, there’s always the “Show In News Feed” option to uncheck. Or consider LinkedIn: This site is a great option for those you may see a professional future with because it’s built upon resumes and professionalism instead of “he said; she said” statuses and unnecessary selfie pictures. You’re working toward a career, a job and a future and your social networks should cater to the image you want the world to have of you and your passions.

There’s also the question of “Do I actually consider this person a friend anymore?” Over time, the answer may become “No”...but it’s not a negative: It’s just a different chapter in your life. If this is the case, unfriend them or remove them from your news feed (if you’re afraid to upset the person). People mature, change and move on – Facebook is great for keeping in touch but it’s really best for who you want to keep in touch with.

Don’t get me wrong – I’m all about social networking! I utilize Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr and everything else I can get my hands on to promote my band, my work, my interests, my activities and my passions. With its groups and “like” pages, it can be a valuable resource for professionals but know when it’s time to refocus and reimagine who you are. You aren’t the same person you were in high school...and for most of us, that’s a great thing!

Mike Sheffey is a junior at Wofford College double majoring in computer science and Spanish. He loves all things music and has recently taken up photography. Mike works for an on-campus sports broadcasting company as well as the music news blog PropertyOfZack.com. He hopes to use this blogging position to inform and assist others who are seeking the right college or those currently enrolled in college by providing advice on college life, both in general and specific to Wofford.

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SOTW: CollegeMapper’s $1,000 No Essay Scholarship

This SOTW is Accepting Entries Through April 30th

April 9, 2014

by Suada Kolovic

Looking for some guidance on your college journey? CollegeMapper can help you build a resume, manage your college applications, provide expert advice and now they’ve launch the $1,000 No Essay Scholarship.

The scholarship is open to all students who are least 16 years of age or older who are currently enrolled in high school and have signed up for a CollegeMapper profile; multiple entries in the contest granted to applicants who refer friends to the contest. To apply, please visit CollegeMapper or complete a free scholarship search to find additional opportunities.

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Realizing the Truth About a College Education

March 19, 2013

Realizing the Truth About a College Education

by Carly Gerber

During my time at college, I found myself unhappy and unfulfilled. I despised my major and I wasn’t a fan of my campus. This being my second college, I figured it must be that college itself wasn’t for me, so I decided to drop out. I took a few months to experiment with careers that didn’t require college degrees but my choice to leave school kept haunting me.

In the midst of my time away from higher education, I came across a Chicago Tribune article which detailed common misconceptions students have about college....and I realized right away that I was one of those students! Here are just a few points the Trib covered:

  • There’s a misconception that a college degree doesn’t hold any value; like any investment, however, a college degree pays off over time. A college graduate’s earnings rise faster and peak later than the earnings of someone with a high school diploma alone. A college degree is not a guarantee of success but grads do have better odds of finding, keeping and excelling at their jobs long term.
  • Another misconception is that it doesn’t matter where you attend college...yet it’s the most important decision regarding your college career! Getting in is half the battle – the other half is deciding where to attend because that could determine if you stay there and get your degree. In real estate, they say the three most important things to consider when buying a house are location, location, location. The same goes for choosing a college: If you hate the location, it’s likely you won’t enjoy your college experience.

After realizing the true importance of a college education, I knew what I had to do. Recognizing that it was the location of my school and the major I had chosen that were bothering me, I spent my time off figuring out a major I want to immerse myself in and finding a university in a location I can’t wait to live. I’ll be returning to school in the fall!

Carly Gerber is majoring in journalism at Columbia College Chicago. She loves fashion and hopes to cover the topic for a Chicago-area magazine. In her free time, she focuses on her blog, loves making jewelry and spending time on Pinterest and Pose. She hopes to use this blog to guide and relate to its followers: college students like herself!

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Does the Perfect Roommate Exist?

How to Choose Who to Live With Next Year

March 21, 2013

Does the Perfect Roommate Exist?

by Katlyn Clark

College can sound very exciting with moving away from home and being on your own but who you live with can make or break your college experience.

Most colleges require freshmen to live in campus housing with roommates. Roommates can be chosen at random, via special requests or at college orientation. (Some schools, like Campbell, even have "Class of" or "Admitted Students" pages on Facebook and students can find their future roommates there.) I had a roommate selected at random and she moved out halfway through the semester but I knew this was a common situation: Sometimes students move out to room with a better friend or they change dorms because the new residence hall is closer to their classes and extracurricular activities.

How do you know if you have found the right roommate? Talk to them! Discuss what you both expect to do at college, your respective bedtimes and what you’ll bring into the dorm. If you think the match is a good one, sign a roommate contract but if you don't think your living situation is going to work, try to make a room change sooner than later. Maybe you met someone in class or on your floor who is also having roommate issues, which makes a potential swap even easier.

If I could choose the best way to find a roommate, I would go the random route again and connect with them prior to move-in day. Most people I know on campus were paired with their roommates randomly and now consider each other good friends...but that may not be the case for everyone: It all depends on what type of person you are and if you can handle living with someone else. There is a perfect roommate for everyone!

So how did you find your roommate? Did it work out, were there issues or would you have change the way you were paired?

Katlyn Clark is a freshman at Campbell University majoring in journalism and minoring in marketing. She hopes to become a broadcast journalist for entertainment or write for a magazine such as People or Seventeen. In her spare time, Katlyn loves to hang out with friends and family and watch sports; she is a Christian who is so thankful for God’s many blessings in her life. Katlyn is from Elizabeth City, North Carolina and loves Tim Tebow, Pinterest, the WWE and cats.

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