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Greek Life Benefits Extend Beyond Toga Parties

by Anna Meskishvili

I’m a proud member of the Greek system now but it took a lot of convincing for me to don a pair of letters. Regardless, I consider joining Kappa Delta one of the best decisions – if not the best – I’ve made during my time at BU. Thinking about going Greek? There are several key things all incoming pre-PNMs (Potential New Members) should know.

With Great Power, Comes Great Responsibility. Initiation immediately connects all your actions to the organization. The Greek system is already slandered with stereotypes so it’s crucial that all PNMs take this seriously. I know, insert eye roll here, but it is actually more involved than you think. Most Greek organizations were established hundreds of years ago and have functioning National Headquarters; representing your sorority or fraternity well is to represent yourself at the highest degree.

Don’t Stop Believin’. Greek organizations are based upon many traditions. Some are expired notions about dancing in public, while others are more timeless ideas of elegance and education. Make sure you connect with the ideals of the organization because your commitment is a lifelong one. There are academic, financial and social standards that must be upheld – can you police yourself?

Time of Your Life. Going Greek has only made my life better. My sisters are wonderful women I adore and I have developed many friendships outside my sisterhood yet still in the Greek community. Greek life expands your horizons through Alumni Chapters, which will likely help you post-college (mentoring, networking, finding a job, etc.).

Keep Calm and Carry On. With all that said, Greek life isn’t for everyone. Even if you attend a Greek-heavy school, make sure that being part of “the system” doesn’t take over your life. My mantra for being a Kappa Delta is that it complements all the other parts of my life rather than defines it.

Anna Meskishvili is a rising senior at Boston University pursuing a degree in public relations at the College of Communication and hopes to someday work in healthcare administration communication. She is part of Kappa Delta at BU and has loved every second of it. She is also involved in Public Relations Student Society of America and Ed on Campus. Anna was born in the Republic of Georgia and considers herself a citizen of the world because she’s lived in Russia, England, France, Brooklyn and Connecticut. She loves to travel, run and learn.


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Off-Campus Housing Advice for College Freshmen

by Jessica Seals

College freshmen have several things to be excited about. They have finally gotten out of high school and now have the chance to go off to college where they will feel more independent. One of the most exciting things about going off to college is getting to live in the dorms. Living in the dorms is somewhat similar to having your own apartment but most dorms still have rules that you must live by. Although dorm life excludes parental supervision, some freshmen still opt for an off-campus apartment. They feel as though they cannot share a tiny space with a stranger or that a dorm still has just as many restrictions as living at home. While there can be perks to having your own apartment (more personal space and not having to worry about sharing your belongings, for example), there are still issues you may encounter.

While living on campus, it’s much easier to be on time to class because the only travelling you have to do is walking. When living off campus, you will have to wake up and leave your apartment much earlier in order to beat traffic, find a parking space and walk to class. This can be overwhelming to someone who is not used to going to college classes and has limited time management experience.

Another problem that freshmen who have to pay their own rent run into is working obsessively to pay for their apartments. If you do this, your grades will begin to slip and you run the risk of being too tired to go to class because you have to work long hours – not a great way to begin your college career!

Although living off campus can help you become more independent, some freshmen enter the situation without a good plan. If you’ll be living off campus as a freshman, make sure your plan includes ways to manage time so that you are not constantly late to or absent from class, and can balance your work and school schedules. You can be successful in having your own apartment during your freshman year if you are mentally prepared for the challenge!

Jessica Seals is currently a senior at the University of Memphis majoring in political science and minoring in English. At the University of Memphis, she is the secretary of the Pre-Law Society, the philanthropy chair of the Phi Kappa Phi Student Council and a member of Professional Assertive United Sisters of Excellence (PAUSE), Golden Key Honor Society, Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society, Sigma Alpha Lambda Honor Society, and Black Scholars Unlimited. She also volunteers to tutor her fellow classmates and hopes to attend law school in the near future.


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One Opportunity Can Provide Experience in Multiple Fields

by Radha Jhatakia

College means different things to different people. For some, it’s a time to party and enjoy being away from home. For others, it’s a time to study and earn a degree. And for others still, it’s a time to utilize resources for post-college opportunities, like internships and volunteer work. These experiences help students develop skills that can be utilized in their careers of choice. But what if you have multiple majors or are considering work in a variety of fields after graduation? Is there one opportunity that can benefit all your future endeavors? You bet!

Take me, for instance: I am a communication studies major and I hope to go into marketing and public relations. Apart from communication skills, I will need to learn business techniques so I joined a business organization at my school. Good thing I did – I was immediately offered a job with the corporate relations board. Though the position is purely voluntary, I will learn a lot about the various aspects of working in the business world as well as organization and time management skills, presentation techniques and proper etiquette in the professional world.

These skills can definitely be applied to the careers I am interested in but the benefits continue: These skills can be applied to any profession in any field. All employers appreciate an employee who can manage time and work, give efficient presentations and is precise with their work. I encourage you today to get involved today, whether the position is paid, volunteer or for course credit. There is no harm in applying – I applied to be one of Scholarships.com's virtual interns and now I have some writing experience which is useful in every career!

Radha Jhatakia is a communications major at San Jose State University. She's a transfer student who had some ups and downs in school and many obstacles to face; these challenges – plus support from family, friends and cat – have only made Radha stronger and have given her the experience to help others with the same issues. In her spare time, she enjoys writing, reading, cooking, sewing and designing. A social butterfly, Radha hopes to work in public relations and marketing upon graduation.


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Interviewing as a College Student

by Radha Jhatakia

Having a job offer before you graduate is ideal but doesn’t always happen. The truth is it’s slightly easier to get a job in college than after because you are on a different playing field than recent grads. When applying for a job in college, you go through university relations but after you swing your tassel from right to left, you become a candidate for human resources like everyone else applying for the position.

Applying starts with the resume. An impressive college resume doesn’t mean multiple pages of volunteer experiences and jobs – it’s about quality, not quantity. Highlight your most important jobs, internships and community service organizations and focus on how the skills you’ve gained would add to the job you’re interested in. Be prepared to talk about these attributes in more detail in your cover letter and during your interview.

If you get an interview, remember to relax. Employers look for students who are confident and collected during the interview – if you can’t handle the pressure of the interview, how will you handle the responsibilities of the job? Bring extra copies of your resume and be sure to dress appropriately: Employers already have certain standards in mind for college applicants and arriving prepared and dressing professionally will show them you are mature and willing to take on responsibilities and tasks that graduates can. In the days leading up to your interview, practice answers to basic questions. Remember, you’ll be having a conversation so try not to sound too rehearsed.

After interviewing, take it upon yourself to follow up with a thank you note to your interviewer, preferably a handwritten one and never one sent from your cell phone. This seemingly small gesture will go a long way in employers’ books; you’ll stand out from the crowd in a positive way and land the job – or at least some interview experience – as a result!

Radha Jhatakia is a communications major at San Jose State University. She's a transfer student who had some ups and downs in school and many obstacles to face; these challenges – plus support from family, friends and cat – have only made Radha stronger and have given her the experience to help others with the same issues. In her spare time, she enjoys writing, reading, cooking, sewing and designing. A social butterfly, Radha hopes to work in public relations and marketing upon graduation.


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Job Fair Preparation: Why It Counts

by Radha Jhatakia

Job and internship fairs are students’ gateways to life after graduation because they provide exposure to what employment and internship opportunities are really out there. In addition to perusing the booths and picking up some swag, college students can also network and make connections with potential employers...but only if they prepare correctly.

The first thing college students should realize is that the recruiters are taking time out of their work days to come to speak to you. Their time is valuable and students should not waste it. Find out what companies will be at the fair ahead of time and research what they are looking for. A recruiter will be more willing to speak to someone who knows about their company than someone with no background knowledge. By doing your homework, you’ll show you are serious about your interest in working for this particular employer.

Second, dress professionally. Think of a job fair as a pre-interview: Recruiters will be turned off if you show up in informal attire, especially if they took the time to wear a suit. Leave the jeans, sneakers and college hoodies back at the dorm: Dressing professionally shows you are ready for the working world and committed to your goals.

Last but not least, have multiple copies of a polished resume with you. In the weeks leading up to the fair, bring your resume to your school’s career center and have them help fix it up. Remember to list your work history in reverse chronological order and highlight only your most significant and important achievements. You can also tailor your resume to fit specific companies – a move that definitely won’t go unnoticed.

These are the most important things I think college students should do when preparing for a job or internship fair but what’s worked best for you?

Radha Jhatakia is a communications major at San Jose State University. She's a transfer student who had some ups and downs in school and many obstacles to face; these challenges – plus support from family, friends and cat – have only made Radha stronger and have given her the experience to help others with the same issues. In her spare time, she enjoys writing, reading, cooking, sewing and designing. A social butterfly, Radha hopes to work in public relations and marketing upon graduation.


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Graduation: A Time of Celebration or Stress?

by Jessica Seals

As I type this blog entry, I have less than two months of college left before I get my bachelor’s degree...and I am on an emotional rollercoaster.

When I first found out that I would be able to graduate a semester early, I was overcome with joy and during the summer, I could not wait to begin the fall semester and kept having visions of walking across the stage and smiling proudly as I realized all of my hard work had paid off. Although my excitement grows more and more each day, so does my stress level. Graduation is a wonderful time because family and friends gather to watch you close one chapter of your life and hear your plans of starting a new one. I am elated to know that everyone I care about will soon get to see how hard I have been working in school when they see all of the honors I’ve earned but since that day isn’t here just yet, there’s still much work to be done.

Although I am graduating, my workload has actually increased. I have to take the LSAT to get into law school and put together things such as my letters of recommendation and personal statements for my law school applications. I am very satisfied with the grades that I have made so far but the law school admissions process is pretty daunting and I often find myself frazzled when I think about how close the application deadlines are! I kind of wish I could hop in a time machine and go to May 2012 see how things worked out.

Behind all the stress, however, I know one thing is certain: I will make it through and when I do, the smile on my face will be even bigger and wider than it was at my high school graduation because of everything I’ve accomplished. Soon-to-be graduates, what are you looking forward to the most?

Jessica Seals is currently a senior at the University of Memphis majoring in political science and minoring in English. At the University of Memphis, she is the secretary of the Pre-Law Society, the philanthropy chair of the Phi Kappa Phi Student Council and a member of Professional Assertive United Sisters of Excellence (PAUSE), Golden Key Honor Society, Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society, Sigma Alpha Lambda Honor Society, and Black Scholars Unlimited. She also volunteers to tutor her fellow classmates and hopes to attend law school in the near future.


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Facial Piercings, Visible Tattoos and Your Future

by Radha Jhatakia

Tattoos and facial piercings have become part of modern day society and college culture. There is nothing wrong with this – I myself have seven piercings (three in each ear and one in my nose) and a tattoo – but with these artistic choices can come consequences that we may not think of when we are younger and attempting to fit in.

Many members of older generations do not view tattoos and piercings the same way we do. To them, they are forms of rebellion, disrespect and, most importantly, decisions that make it increasingly difficult to build favorable professional reputations. If you have a facial piercing, interviewing with a professional organization is risky: Unless you have an exceptional resume and amazing skills, most employers won't take you seriously.

Visible tattoos are deal breakers for many employers as well, especially for those who work alongside customers and are constantly representing the company. Professional workplaces will not tolerate visible tattoos; if you have any but also have your heart set on a career with this kind of organization, you should cover them up. Though many offices have adopted more casual dress codes, visible tattoos are still a long way from being accepted and could hurt your chances of getting hired: If there’s one position available and the other applicant has a cleaner cut appearance, you could lose out.

If you just have to get a tattoo or piercing, I am not going to try to stop you. Just remember that the choices you make now will affect you in the future.

Radha Jhatakia is a communications major at San Jose State University. She's a transfer student who had some ups and downs in school and many obstacles to face; these challenges – plus support from family, friends and cat – have only made Radha stronger and have given her the experience to help others with the same issues. In her spare time, she enjoys writing, reading, cooking, sewing and designing. A social butterfly, Radha hopes to work in public relations and marketing upon graduation.


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Moving in the Middle of the Semester

by Kayla Herrera

Whether the rent is too high, the landlord is negligent or there is an army of flying squirrels gnawing away at your apartment, your housing situation may need to change. This usually happens at a most inopportune time, like in the middle of the semester; it’s is a stressful, horrible and distracting experience but if your current place is bad enough (remember my last post?), the move will benefit you in the end.

Packing is a nightmare – not only is your place going to look like a tornado ripped through but if you do not keep your school stuff together, it will get lost in the mess – but you can maintain some sense of order. Keep a designated space for school work, books and any other college necessities or put everything in a labeled box so you will know exactly where to search when you need something for school.

As with your school supplies, separate your items into well-marked boxes to make unpacking easier and then begin transporting the boxes. Try to schedule moving day for a weekend or day you do not have class or work; unfortunately, I only had one day and had to skip all of my classes to get the job done but I did let my professors know ahead of time. When you arrive at your new place, make sure everything appears as promised in your lease before you start unpacking.

Moving in the middle of the semester is awful, I know. Things will get crazy, messy and even unmanageable but the best thing you can do is to stay organized. The hustle and bustle of a move has been known throw wrenches in otherwise perfectly timed schedules so use a planner or cell phone calendar to remember important dates and appointments while you are relocating. Good luck and enjoy your new abode!

In addition to being a Scholarships.com virtual intern, Michigan Tech student Kayla Herrera is a media coordinator for the Michigan Tech Youth Programs and is a writer for The Daily News in Iron Mountain, Mich., Examiner.com and WHOA Magazine. She love a tantalizing, action-packed video game and can't get enough of horror movies (Stephen King's books always have her in their grip, though she prefers the old over the new). Writing is what she has always done, and that is what she is here to do.


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The Buzz About Beekeeping

November 14, 2011

The Buzz About Beekeeping

by Lisa Lowdermilk

If you're like most people, the thought of bees and the stings that can come with them fills you with dread. But if you're looking for a career where you can learn more about the hard-working critters, make a decent wage and spend a lot of time outdoors in the process, beekeeping might just be for you.

Many beekeepers are nearing retirement and thus, the beekeeping industry has a wealth of employment opportunities for up and coming beekeepers. Grande Prairie Regional College in Edmonton, Canada is hoping to produce the individuals to fill these positions with its 45-week beekeeping program. Students will learn how to construct wooden beehives, market honey products, keep bees safe from disease and a particular focus on queen rearing, or the process of raising healthy queen bees. (After all, you can't expect to produce much honey without an effective queen!) Participants are also promised 26 weeks of paid work in the industry. The program is thought to be the most comprehensive beekeeping program in North America and will show students just how crucial bees are to the economy and life in general. In addition to honey, bees play an integral role in the creation of candles, candy and cosmetics. As if that's not enough, almost a third of our food in North America would be impossible without bees' pollination!

If you're interested in applying for GPRC's beekeeping program, you can find out more about the program here. The application deadline is December 1st so get yours in soon to avoid the sting of rejection! If you decide you'd rather keep your studies confined to the U.S., there are also a variety of beekeeping organizations devoted to the practice all over the country. Get the buzz from this list.

Lisa Lowdermilk is a published poet, avid video gamer and artist. Her poems have appeared in Celebrate Young Poets: West (Fall 2006) edition and Widener University's The Blue Route. She enjoys watching thrillers, trying different restaurants and attempting to breakdance. Lisa is now majoring in professional writing at the University of Colorado Denver.


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Cyber Monday Could Be a College Student’s Best Friend

by Jessica Seals

Waking up at 2 a.m. to stand outside in the freezing cold waiting for a store to open is a holiday tradition for some people. On the other hand, there are thousands of others who refuse to give up sleep to stand in a long line for an item that will sell out before they even get inside the store. That’s right: I’m talking about Black Friday and for those of you who are on tight budgets – aka almost all college students! – it may seem like this day is your only chance to get holiday presents at affordable prices...but it’s not.

After experiencing the fights over the most-sought after items every year on Black Friday, I decided to stop giving in to this “holiday” in favor of participating in Cyber Monday (the Monday after Thanksgiving). Retailers have noticed that the number of online purchases is steadily increasing; therefore, they put some of the same sale prices that can be found in stores online. This is great for college students because they can spend the day after Thanksgiving with their families instead of arguing with strangers. Win-win!

I have become a Cyber Monday proponent because I prefer to do all of my shopping from the comforts of my own home – far away from angry shoppers who try to snatch items from my cart while I am not looking. As store lines continue to grow longer and the televisions and game systems sell out even faster, Cyber Monday is becoming a more attractive option. I can almost hear sighs of relief from college students everywhere who are trying to juggle countless end-of-semester commitments!

Jessica Seals is currently a senior at the University of Memphis majoring in political science and minoring in English. At the University of Memphis, she is the secretary of the Pre-Law Society, the philanthropy chair of the Phi Kappa Phi Student Council and a member of Professional Assertive United Sisters of Excellence (PAUSE), Golden Key Honor Society, Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society, Sigma Alpha Lambda Honor Society, and Black Scholars Unlimited. She also volunteers to tutor her fellow classmates and hopes to attend law school in the near future.


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