News Articles About Work Study

Getting a job in college can be a good opportunity for students in financial need, taking off tuition charges or putting more spending money directly into their pockets. Although choosing a job can be a stressful decision, one of the biggest issues comes from deciding between on- or off-campus options. There are upsides and downsides to both but fortunately, it is not too hard to find out which employment choice is better for you.

Deciding Between On- and Off-Campus Employment

August 13, 2013
by Melissa Garrett
Getting a job in college can be a good opportunity for students in financial need, taking off tuition charges or putting more spending money directly into their pockets. Although choosing a job can

The student librarian or the math tutor in the tutoring center at your university may be one of the thousands of students involved in the Federal Work Study program. 

The U.S. Department of Education explains that the Federal Work Study program involves universities assigning college students part-time jobs in their institutions or through private employers. The income may be minimum wage or higher (it depends on the work the student is doing) and the income goes toward the students’ college expenses. For example, the recipient can have the funds go directly toward tuition or books.

How Work-Study Can Help You Pay for School

May 6, 2013
by Carly Gerber
The student librarian or the math tutor in the tutoring center at your university may be one of the thousands of students involved in the Federal Work Study program. The U.S. Department of

In terms of employment in college, on-campus jobs are the way to go. They get you that spending money you need while keeping you up to date with campus activities. In a way, they make you feel like a great contributor to the campus and its events.

Working Your Way Through College...and Enjoying It!

April 24, 2013
by Mike Sheffey
In terms of employment in college, on-campus jobs are the way to go. They get you that spending money you need while keeping you up to date with campus activities. In a way, they make you feel like

After classes, homework and studying, college students often discover that they have some free time on their hands. Some take on extracurricular activities (both fun and professional) but realize it would be cool to make some money as well. Instead of rushing off campus to score a job at the local mall – something that can be difficult for students without cars – see what kind of employment options are available on campus first.

Finding On-Campus Employment

March 4, 2013
by Katlyn Clark
After classes, homework and studying, college students often discover that they have some free time on their hands. Some take on extracurricular activities (both fun and professional) but realize

If you want to go to college but can’t completely afford it, don’t expect Mitt Romney to help you bridge the financial gap.

Romney on College Costs

March 6, 2012
by Alexis Mattera
GOP Candidate Offers Little Comfort to Current and Hopeful College Students

Wouldn't it be amazing if that super expensive college you were just accepted into said, Hey there, new friend – thanks for all your hard work saving, scrimping and scholarship searching but we’ll take it from here, financially? It can happen...kind of.

Sixty-Two Schools Meet Students’ Full Financial Need

February 22, 2012
by Alexis Mattera
Wouldn't it be amazing if that super expensive college you were just accepted into said, "Hey there, new friend – thanks for all your hard work saving, scrimping and scholarship searching but we’ll

Did you know that more than 70 colleges across the country have replaced loans with grants? That’s right: Schools are offering more free money to entice students to enter their hallowed halls, meaning they will not be saddled with the often-dreaded student loan payments after graduation. What institutions come out on top? Here are a few of the best aid policies, courtesy of the Washington Post’s Daniel de Vise:

Princeton University: The Tigers lead the pack time wise, first cutting loans in 1998 and nixing them completely in 2001.

Harvard University: After eliminating loans in 2008, Harvard implemented a “zero to 10” standard, which pledges families earning up to $180,000 will pay 10 percent of their income at most toward college-related fees.

Amherst College: The school replaced loans with grants and work-study for all students in Fall 2008 and the number of students eligible for Pell grants has nearly doubled to 23 percent as a result.

Claremont McKenna and Pomona: Loans were also phased out here in 2008 but not just to help poor students. Roger Huddle, a rising Pomona senior with a household income approaching $100,000, received enough aid to cover roughly two-thirds of the full cost of attendance.

Yale University: The New Haven-based Ivy meets full demonstrated need without loans, capping the contribution at 10 percent of income for families earning up to $130,000.

The Best Financial Aid Policies in Higher Ed

July 13, 2011
by Alexis Mattera
Did you know that more than 70 colleges across the country have replaced loans with grants? That’s right: Schools are offering more free money to entice students to enter their hallowed halls,

There’s good news and bad news regarding state aid for students. The good: State financial aid for college students, including grants, work-study and loans, rose by nearly 4 percent last year. The bad: Just about half of the states surveyed cut need-based grants, even as demand for financial aid increased.

The Good News and Bad News About State Aid for Students

July 11, 2011
by Alexis Mattera
There’s good news and bad news regarding state aid for students. The good: State financial aid for college students, including grants, work-study and loans, rose by nearly 4 percent last year. The
View 10 More Articles