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Tips for Answering True/False Questions on Standardized Tests

Many test takers dread dealing with standardized test questions in the true/false format, as they think that these types of questions are more difficult than the other standardized test questions. True/false questions can be tricky and it is important that you pay very close attention to the details of each question before you mark your answer.

Standardized Test Taking Tips for True/False Questions:

  • Don't skim over true/false questions. Carefully read every word of the question, keeping in mind that the tiniest detail can affect the answer.
  • Pay attention to negative words and prefixes (such as un, non, etc.) that impact the meaning of a statement.
  • Watch for double negatives, such as "not unlikely." If an event is "not unlikely," that means it is in fact a likely occurrence.
  • Watch for qualifying modifiers (words like sometimes, usually, probably, might, etc.) tenc to be used in true statements.
  • Watch for extreme modifiers (words like always, never, absolutely, only, no one, the best, the worst, etc.) that may make a statement false that seems at first glance to be true.
  • Remember that questions that are only partially true are in fact false.

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