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Enrolling at a Branch Campus vs. a Main Campus

Jun 30, 2015

by Ashley Grego

When most people hear Penn State, they think of the college town located in State College famous for Beaver Stadium and football. It's less likely that people think of the other Penn States - the branch campuses. Technically, they are the same university...but perception is different.

Although main campuses may offer more activities, different classes and a completely different lifestyle than branch campuses, it doesn't necessarily mean one is better than the other. In fact, there are benefits of branch campuses that students should consider before attending the main campus.

First, branches are smaller and offer students a closer experience with professors and students. If students prefer one-on-one connections with their professors and classmates where everybody knows each other's names, branches can offer this. This can also make for an easier transition for students coming from smaller high schools.

Second, some branches are completely different from the main. Some branches specialize in specific majors – a benefit for students in those majors. (For example, UConn's Avery Point campus in Groton offers specialization for marine sciences.) Another example of this is branch campuses outside of the country. Unlike study abroad, the student will not be attending a different college and earning transfer credits toward their university: They will be attending their school branched overseas, like Carnegie Mellon's branch in Qatar. Another benefit? Experiencing college abroad can be cheaper than study abroad!

Third, regardless of attending a branch or main, all of the diplomas (at least at most schools) will say the same thing. Even though I attend UPJ, my diploma will read "graduate of the University of Pittsburgh." This can provide an automatic boost to students who may think attending the branch will negate the rest of their resume.

The last benefit of attending a branch campus is even if students do not plan to attend the branch campus for all four years, transferring credits will be easier. By staying within the same university system, students are less likely lose any credits because most classes at a branch campus are at the main campus.

Although branch campuses are not for every student, they are certainly something to consider!

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Groundbreaking Same-Sex Marriage Ruling Impacts Higher Education

Jun 29, 2015

by Chris Bernardi

With a decision that will rewrite United States history, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Friday that the Constitution guarantees a right to same-sex marriage. The Chronicle of Higher Education recently reported that for most colleges, the impact for employees and students will be minimal but uncertainty looms at Christian colleges.

The SCOTUS decision could potentially affect several institutions’ tax-exempt status, accreditation, student housing policies and ability to admit and hire people based on religious convictions. “Many religious institutions simply could not afford to operate” without tax exemptions, said Southern Baptist Theological Seminary president R. Albert Mohler, Jr. “So it’s not a question of tax exemptions, it’s a question of existence.” However, Jennifer E. Walsh, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Azusa Pacific University, was much more optimistic: She believed the ruling would not interfere with religious colleges’ liberties and that “undoubtedly, Christian colleges will find themselves engaging in more discourse” about gay rights.

Colleges in states that had already legalized same-sex marriage have already been receiving benefits for their employees. While same-sex couples will see a possible increase in benefits as a result of the ruling, the same-sex couples receiving cohabitation benefits who choose not to wed could see those benefits disappear, said Indiana University sociology professor Brian Powell. Students from states that had not legalized same-sex marriage and chose out of state schools for a more-progressive institution, could be more inclined to attend a public institution in state, Powell added.

Because colleges have been dealing with a “patchwork of laws across states” over the years, the ruling will make it easier for institutions to support gay students and professors, said Suzanne B. Goldberg, director of the Sexuality and Gender Law Clinic at the Columbia University Law School. Professors considering job opportunities will undoubtedly have an expanded amount of choices. As for advocates for lesbian, gay, bisexual and other students, they now believe the ruling will allow them to move on to other issues such as access to higher education.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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The Perfect College: It Exists...But It's Different for Everyone

Jun 29, 2015

by Erica Lewis

My name is Erica Lewis and I attend the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where I am majoring in food science and technology. I chose UNL because it was the right fit for me: It was close to home but far enough away that I didn't feel like my parents were right there! UNL also offered many great scholarship opportunities, which made it more affordable than many of the other schools that I looked at. Finally, I'm a huge sports fan and the Huskers are so much fun to watch!

I chose to major in food science and technology because it combines my love of food with my love for science...that may sound a bit cliché, but it's true! I already knew how to cook but now I get to learn about the components of food and how they are affected by various cooking methods and so much more. Like UNL as a whole, the food science and technology department also offers many scholarship opportunities, which was really nice to know when comparing my options.

In my spare time, you can typically find me at club meetings, Husker games of any kind or watching TV while working on homework with my friends – the great part about college is you can choose to create the schedule you want and do what you want with your free time! I was interested in becoming a Scholarships.com virtual intern because I knew it would give me the chance to tell other students about my college experience and help them make their decision on which college to attend. I know that choosing a college can seem a bit daunting at times so I want to help readers make the choice that's best for them!

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Seattle University Grad Addresses Campus Safety with Smartphone App

Jun 26, 2015

by Chris Bernardi

As an undergraduate at Seattle University, Rob Monkman was held at gunpoint, robbed and helplessly watched as the assailants kidnapped his roommate. What seemed like his worst nightmare had become a life or death reality: The robbers threatened to kill his roommate if he called the police, leaving the fate of two young lives in unpredictable hands. Fortunately, he and his roommate came out of the situation unscathed and Monkman turned the experience into an opportunity to help others avoid similar scenarios.

In 2013, Monkman launched React Mobile, a mobile app that lets its users discreetly notify a network of authorities and contacts if they are in trouble. With the press of a button, a customized alert is sent out to a contact list, notifying them of the user’s GPS location. Monkman has recently expanded on his idea with the React Sidekick, a separate panic button device that is connected to the React Mobile app through Bluetooth. It currently retails for $59.99, an affordable price for college students seeking peace of mind.

“Holding a phone can make you a target for attackers because you are displaying valuables,” University of Washington student Suzanne Scharlock says. “Using the React (Sidekick) Bluetooth device is a safer and more discreet way to be safe as you walk home.” A pilot program for the Sidekick will launch in July at Seattle University, where about 100 students will try it out. Occidental College and the University of Washington will also test the app and Sidekick, moving toward Monkman’s goal of making his invention a campus-wide solution. (For more details about Monkman’s experience and invention, check out USA Today College.)

Students, would you use React Mobile or the new React Sidekick? What methods do you employ to stay safe on campus?

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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College Student Tased, Left to Die in Jail

Jun 25, 2015

by Chris Bernardi

When Matthew Ajibade walked into Chatham County Jail on a domestic violence charge on January 1st, little did he know that he had taken his last breath of the cool Georgian winter air. That evening, within the walls of the notable county jail tucked away in historic Savannah, Ajibade was found dead, strapped to a chair.

According to ABC 7 News, Ajibade, a 21-year-old Savannah College of Art and Design student, was originally arrested after a dispute with his girlfriend. During the altercation, Ajibade injured three deputies and initial reports show Ajibade had been stunned with a Taser while he was restrained; he was then left unmonitored in an isolation cell, where his body was discovered. On Wednesday, a grand jury charged former jail employees Maxine Evans and Jason Kenny and contract health care worker Gregory Brown with aggravated assault and cruelty to an inmate. (Additionally, Evans and Brown are charged with public record fraud, while Brown faces a third charge of making a false statement.) According the grand jury, the log book had been falsified to state routine checks were conducted on the inmate’s cell.

The victim's family released a copy of the death certificate, which ruled homicide caused by blunt-force trauma. Chatham County Coroner Dr. Bill Wessinger concluded Ajibade suffered several blows to his head and upper body and some blood was found in his skull case. Florida defense lawyer Mark O'Mara was adamant that Ajibade, who suffered from bipolar disorder, and was having a manic episode when jail deputies "beat the (expletive) of him to get control of him." As for the indictments of Evans, Kenny and Brown, O'Mara said it's "too little too late": He believes Chatham County District Attorney Meg Heap should have already pursued a felony murder charge based on the fact the grand jury found that there was aggravated assault, the direct cause of Ajibade's death.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Top 5 Lessons of a Part-Time Job

Jun 24, 2015

by Emily Rabinowitz

The summer before my senior year, most of my peers interned at prestigious companies, traveled the world, or spent hours writing college essays and studying for the SAT. I, on the other hand, got a part time position earning $8.25 an hour at Old Navy.

As I prepare for college this year, I can safely say that my job experience is one of my biggest assets. Here's what I learned:

  • Responsibility. One of my first shifts was the infamous One Dollar Flip Flop Day. With constant lines and eight-hour shifts, I learned responsibility. When on the sales floor, I could not lapse into rudeness even when I had a difficult customer, check my phone even when my friends texted me, and I most definitely could not disobey my superiors.
  • Social Issues. Over the course of the past year, I worked every major holiday from Black Friday to New Year’s Eve, allowing me to understand that the world does not stop because school went on vacation. I started to realize how many parents might have to sacrifice Christmas morning with their children in order to put dinner on the table.
  • Spending. My favorite meal at Chipotle costs about $12 - that is over an hour of work! This came as a shock to me and triggered me to begin tracking my spending and even opening a savings account to lock away future funds.
  • Experience. Having a year in retail, let alone employment, made me marketable. I was able to secure a second job within a month of applying. My job will also transfer with me to college.
  • Respect. In a workplace environment, everyone is your equal. In learning to respect my colleagues, I have gained insight from people in dozens of walks of life.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Man Stabbed in Face for Opinion on Value of Higher Education

Jun 23, 2015

by Chris Bernardi

One man's opinion of the value of a college education came at a greater price than he ever expected: a laceration from the corner of his mouth to his ear.

According to an article in "The Chronicle of Higher Education", a verbal argument Friday night at Gunston Middle School in Arlington, VA concluded with a man drawing a pocket knife to slash the other across the face. The argument was initiated from a difference of opinions on “the worth and importance of college education”, police said. The crime report did not specify if the victim was arguing for or against the value of higher education.

Police say the "fairly large laceration" caused significant bleeding due to striking a minor artery. The victim was admitted to George Washington University Hospital, where he received 60 stitches. The suspect, who fled the scene, is described as a Hispanic man, 6 feet 3 inches and 220 pounds. At the time of the incident, he was wearing a pink Nike polo shirt and blue jeans. According to officials, the investigation "is ongoing".

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Head vs. Heart: Which Should You Follow When Choosing a College?

Jun 22, 2015

by Ashley Grego

Choosing my school wasn't a heart-driven decision. My heart eyed up Pitt Main and the possibilities of finally living in the city I've loved my entire childhood. I so badly wanted to go there; however, it was illogical in more than one way: My hometown actually is Johnstown - where one of Pitt's branch campuses is located - and not only does Pitt-Johnstown supply me with the identical diploma as a Pitt Main student, it also saves me roughly $10,000 a year because I commute. Putting aside my dream of life in the city was difficult, but I knew going to Pitt-Johnstown made more sense.

Once starting at Pitt-Johnstown (UPJ, as we call it), selecting my major was more heart-driven. Even though I got high honors in high school, I knew the science world wasn't in my direct future, maybe unless I wrote about it and talked about it - two things I am very confident in and enjoy doing - which led me to the journalism major. I realized early on, however, that it wasn't my exact fit; I wanted to explore other forms of writing and speaking instead so I became a double major in communication and writing. I now plan to do something within the sports industry or get my master's degree from Carnegie Mellon...I hope! Outside of school, I run a sports blog, work, am a NAHL ice girl and play D2 college club hockey at a nearby university. I also intern at my school's sports center and love shopping.

The reason I was interested in this internship is because of my own personal goals and the company itself. I am constantly looking to build my resume and found this as an amazing opportunity. I know that the real career world is a competitive market and I want to have the experience to stand myself out. Looking forward, I look to blogging about anything that comes to mind, from my own experiences to addressing bigger issues in higher education.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Unique Programs + Strong Community + Terrified Excitement = My Ideal College

Jun 19, 2015

by Emily Rabinowitz

Why did I choose NYU? As a recent high school graduate, this is a question I get a lot, especially with NYU's expense and daunting inner city location. The best way to describe the way I feel about NYU is terrified excitement. Unlike any of the other 18 schools I visited, NYU scared me in a way that was challenging and empowering. I saw endless opportunities in their massive travel abroad program, thousands of community service partnerships and dozens of research facilities.

In addition, I was strongly attracted to NYU's unique applied psychology and global public health dual degree; after talking to faculty about this major, I discovered that it is one of the only degrees of its kind in the nation! Made of a tight community and sponsoring the integration of health and psychology, NYU gave me a way to stand out from typical psychology majors and kick start my career.

As a virtual intern, I'm excited to have the opportunity to share advice and engage in meaningful discussion. Writing has always been a passion of mine (National Novel Writing Month, anyone?) and I look forward to using it to inspire my peers on Scholarships.com.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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When College Provides So Much More Than Education

Jun 18, 2015

by Genevieve Grant

Why Iowa? Why Cornell College? I get this on the daily. Why on Earth did I come here of all places? Simple: Cornell College, unlike the other schools I had been admitted to, actually called me – coaches, counselors and even athletes picked up the phone. I felt wanted. They told me about their One Course at a Time schedule and how I'd be able to essentially do anything in 18 days. (If you're unfamiliar, we do a semester's worth of work in those 18 days. One class, one subject, one final and then on to the next.) I was captivated.

Before I knew it, my father dropped me off at Cornell on the first day and drove back to Washington. Yes, I was alone but I have never felt so free in my life. Three years later, I know that coming to Cornell was the best decision I've made thus far in my life. I love this school more than words can express and it has given me so much more than just an education. I am studying presently psychology, anthropology and art and am planning on going into art therapy in the long run, hopefully working with families and children. I don't have a ton of spare time since I also pull a 40-hour work week on top of my full-time course load but despite my crazy schedule, I am as social as I can be and often go out with friends after work.

As a virtual intern for Scholarships.com, I hope to share more stories like my own and report on issues that are relevant to the college scene. I want to be a voice for current students and by doing so, give those who are considering college a chance to hear unfiltered and unscripted testimonials; I also look forward to giving them insight as to what issues are prevalent on campuses and the stances students are taking on these issues.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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