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by Susan Dutca

Students at Vanderbilt University will soon have their sex-reassignment surgeries covered under a new student health-care plan. Without insurance, many individuals are unable to pay for hormones, surgeries and counseling necessary for the transition. From sex-reassignment to breast augmentation, college and universities are taking steps to make their students feel comfortable and more respected.

The desire for more trans inclusivity does not come without opposition from the Tennessee's Republican-led legislature. Rep. Diane Black released her statement, criticizing the "painfully obvious lack of common sense," since "[our] institutions of higher learning exist to graduate students who are career ready and are prepared to compete in the global economy, not to play politics by providing insurance coverage of medically unnecessary procedures while raking in federal grants." Schools such as Ohio University, which already have expanded transgender health coverage, pay an additional $120,000 yearly.

Medicare lifted its ban on coverage for sex-reassignment surgery in May of 2014. Since then, 72 colleges and universities have implemented the plan. Vanderbilt will cover services such as hormone-replacement therapy and other transgender-related operations. Schools with existing policies, such as the University of Arizona, pay for hormone therapy, orchiectomy, and genital reconstructive surgery. VU will be the first university in Tennessee to offer surgery coverage, making it a leader in the movement.

Transgender students have voiced their discontent with schools unwilling to accommodate their health needs. RJ Robles, a transgender graduate student at Vanderbilt Divinity School, was devastated when he found out that breast augmentation was not covered by student health insurance. "I was going to basically have to put my transition on hold," he claimed. Robles is "really proud of the Vanderbilt community for stepping up" and feels like trans students are finally being "celebrated, valued, respected, heard and seen."

According to Cynthia Cyrus, Vice Provost for Learning and Residential Affairs at Vanderbilt, the decision came to pass in a "relatively non-controversial" manner and "not deeply debated in any way." Students at VU claim that there was no debate to begin with and there "was no organized opposition to this policy because [the students] had no idea that such a policy was even being considered." VU later admitted to Fox 17 that the decision (for now) is merely a "political statement," but a "reasonable move in the right direction."

In your opinion, should colleges and universities be covering students' sex-reassignment surgeries, as well as cosmetic surgeries?

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

College students may soon find themselves counting their pennies before deciding to go out on the weekend. What could be worse than being a broke college student? For starters, spending money that you don't have and sending your bank account into the negatives. Overdrafting is most common among Americans ages 18-25, and the average $34.50 penalty fee isn't any less harsh than the national median of $35. But who's to blame - students or colleges?

Universities and colleges have started partnerships with banks to offer on-campus banking services to students, but convenience doesn't mean leniency, and students aren't off the hook when it comes to overdraft fees. The average consumer pays two overdraft fees a year, meaning college students could owe more than $70 in fees. According to NerdWallet, if every college student from participating colleges averages two overdrafts a year, that's $828 million in fees. Why are college students most likely to fall into this snowballing, financial rut? NerdWallet Banking analyst Devan Goldstein claims that "at that age, most people have less money coming in and more pressure to spend money, from peer pressure in particular."

Do colleges and banks have the students' best interest in mind? Some financial experts aren't so sure, as the products they offer come with a "steep price." Banks see the value of partnering with colleges and offer "lucrative deals" that will increase marketing opportunities, especially with the lack of profits from retail bank accounts over the past several years. And of course, there's something in it for the schools - they can receive a large payment from banks - like the case at UC Berkeley, which will receive $17 million over the next ten years for signing with Bank of the West.

Parents and their kids should consider a few things before opening a bank account: overdraft fees, the limit to how many fees can be charged a day, and what happens when a student declines an opt-in for overdraft protection. Experts also advise students to search for better deals at local banks that offer lower fees - this could be a slight issue for campus-bound students who don't have transportation readily available.

So before you write that next ill-advised check your bank account won't cover, don't forget that overdrafting is optional, and there will be a price to pay.

In your opinion, should overdrafting fees be eliminated completely for college students? Or should they have to pay the price for financial irresponsibility? Leave us your comments below.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

Bruce Leslie has already come under fire for some controversial "calls" he's made and now he's been busted phone-scrolling during commencement ceremonies. While he was ON THE STAGE, no less. Colleges and universities are struggling with cell phone policies with students constantly caught using their mobile devices and laptops for non-academic purposes in academic settings and situations. But what's the punishment for a college Chancellor's "cellphone perusing"...during a commencement ceremony? Nothing, really.

Ironically, Alamo Colleges Chancellor Bruce Leslie pushed a self-help book titled The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People into the "system curriculum, replacing a required humanities course." He felt the need to do so after realizing "some graduates hardly looked him in the eye or knew how to shake his hand as they were accepting diplomas during graduation." Following the incident, Leslie apologized "if he offended anyone." He spent a reported 40 minutes scrolling on his smartphone during a commencement at Palo Alto College, where many graduates are first-generation, low-income, and predominantly Mexican-American college students.

This isn't Leslie's first time exhibiting poor etiquette in a professional setting - he's been known to behave poorly at faculty meetings as well. But Leslie is not alone. Other faculty, administrators, and even board members in the world of higher education have been caught drinking and sleeping during commencements. The entire law faculty at the University of California at Berkeley has been known to convene at 10 a.m., graduation day, and have a "leisurely lunch" while graduates filed on stage. They would regroup later, "oblivious to or unnoticed by parents and families."

Were students on their phones during the commencement ceremony? Some have argued that, despite the sometimes poor netiquette displayed by students, educators must be held to the "highest standards of comportment and professionalization," and that they "set institutional culture." One resolution to the problem is to jam cellular devices, but that is illegal since it may obstruct signal from an emergency call. Another option would be to Wi-Fi jam cellphones. Or perhaps implement a no cell phone policy for those on stage.

Do you think educators should have a stricter no cell phone policy? Should the Chancellor receive some form of punishment for his mobile misuse? Leave us your thoughtful comments below.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

One former and one current DePaul student disrupted a presentation at the school's student center earlier this week. One of them snatched the microphone from the interviewer and appeared to threaten the guest speaker, Milo Yiannopoulos, with it. The disturbance was reportedly due to the fundamental disagreement with the subject matter being presented, as it ran counter to that of the protesters who gathered outside prior to the event. However, only one arrest was made and it was not the protester who assaulted the young man interviewing Yiannopoulos, but rather the cameraman who was invited to film the event.

Hundreds of colleges and universities have restrictive speech codes that enforce political correctness and insulate their students from exposure to a lot of information, ideas, and opinions that may differ from that to which they have been exposed in their childhood. As evidenced by the recent shutdown of one conservative guest speaker's event hosted by DePaul's College Republicans at DePaul University, censorship in higher education is increasing at a considerable rate, apparently protecting those who demand that their voices be the only ones heard.

Milo Yiannopoulos, a Breitbart contributor and conservative commentator visited DePaul and spoke on issues of feminism, the transgender rights movement, campus politics, and microaggression. He spoke a solid 15 minutes before a whistle blew and a former DePaul student marched down the aisle to the front stage, and propped himself on the table between Yiannopoulos and the College Republican moderator. A current DePaul student joined shortly thereafter and the number of student protestors increased. One of the two student protestors who initially took the stage grabbed the microphone from the moderator and threatened Yiannopoulos with. Event organizers lost control of the event and it was ultimately cut short.

Spring, a time when most commencement speeches take place, is now referred to as "disinvitation season" in the world of higher education. Business leaders, politicians, authors and comedians are not welcome since social media has become home to endless arguments as to who is a worthy/appropriate/safe choice to deliver the speech. Professors have started to reconsider and restructure their courses in order to avoid sensitive and controversial topics. In response to the incident, DePaul University's President stated that he was "sorry to see” the video of the protest and news reports about it. In his statement he wrote, "Yesterday's speaker was invited to speak at DePaul, and those who interrupted the speech were wrong to do so.” He went on to say, "Universities welcome speakers, give their ideas a respectful hearing, and then respond with additional speech countering the ideas."

Do you think the protestors had the right to disrupt Yiannopoulos’ event? Should DePaul have done more to stop it? Leave us your thoughtful comments below.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

12-year-old Tanishq Abraham has already earned three associate's degrees and has been accepted to two University of California system four-year colleges. 60 percent of college students today are twice that age before they earn a single bachelor's degree.

Tanishq Abraham started taking college courses at age 7 and has been accepted to UC Davis and received the highest honor - a Regents Scholarship - to UC Santa Cruz. He plans to become a doctor and medical researcher before he turns 18. Although professors were reluctant to let him have such a large head start, he began community college when his peers were still in second grade and received three associate's degrees from American River College in general science; math and physical science; and foreign language students. He was allowed to attend under one condition: his mother, a veterinary doctor, had to be present during class. When he wasn't asking questions, he was busy explaining general relativity and special relativity to her.

Abraham joined the IQ society Mensa at the age of 4 and was known for picking up knowledge quickly. His accomplishments have earned him a letter of recognition from President Barak Obama. His younger sister Tiara is an award-winning singer and child genius, scoring a 99 percent on the Mensa IQ test.

Being a child prodigy isn't what many people think it is, Abraham claims. "When you think of a genius, you think of a mad scientist kind of thing." When he's not studying, Abraham is the typical, video-gaming, piano playing, and choir singing kid.

Starting and even graduating college early is a possibility, especially if you have a clear idea what field of study you wish to pursue. If you're still researching different major options, check out our list of major-specific scholarships. And most importantly, apply for and earn scholarships to not only graduate more quickly, but with little to no debt!

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

The Supreme Court recently avoided a major ruling on a case challenging the contraceptive coverage mandate in the Affordable Care Act. The justices decided to let the lower courts battle out the issue of faith-based organizations refusing to offer free contraceptive coverage for women.

This week, all seven cases in the consolidated Zubik v. Buwell, No. 14-1418 were sent back to their appeals courts by the Supreme Court on the issue of contraceptive coverage for women. Finding "no view on the merits of the cases," the opinion states that, "in particular, the Court does not decide whether petitioners' religious exercise has been substantially burdened, whether the Government has a compelling interest, or whether the current regulations are the least restrictive means of serving that interest." This could be viewed as the Supreme Court trying to keep their hands clean or perhaps forcing the government and religious organizations to compromise.

Religious organizations and institutions are not required to provide coverage through their insurance plans but must declare their decision to opt out. The government will then work with the school's insurance provider to continue offering the contraception coverage. However, faith-based schools are calling for a complete opt-out option that has them in no way shape or form “complicit with a practice they do not condone."

The Religious Freedom Act requires colleges to demonstrate that their beliefs are significantly violated and burdened by the contraceptive requirement. So far, 37 religiously-affiliated institutions in higher education have sued the federal government for forcing them to offer free contraception to women. The Obama administration has maintained its position to deny exemptions, stating that the arrangement does not violate the Religious Freedom Act or burden religious organizations.

How do you accommodate the moral objections of religious organizations schools while also offering contraception? Lawyers defending the schools cite that the Religious Freedom Act (1993) keeps the government from burdening their religious freedom. On the other hand, opponents state that federal laws already respect the religious beliefs of faith-based schools, and that a complete exemption isn't ideal since other religious groups - such as the Quakers who oppose financing wars with their tax money - do not get breaks just because they have a certain moral belief.

Do you think religious colleges and universities should be forced to provide contraceptive coverage for women if it contradicts their beliefs? Leave us your thoughtful comments below to start a discussion.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

An openly gay student at Dowling Catholic High School decided to transform stigma into success by serving as a leader and advocate for LGBT rights at his school. Even after creating a gay-straight alliance and being awarded the Gold Matthew Shepard Scholarship, he was told that he could not receive the scholarship at the annual senior awards ceremony.

Last April, Tyler McCubbin, a respectable substitute teacher and volunteer track coach had his full time teaching position offer rescinded after a background check revealed he was openly gay. Dowling High school student Liam Jameson was one of the hundreds of students who protested the perceived injustice through a walkout. In an open letter, Jameson detailed his numerous attempted suicides because he felt alone, afraid, and "dreaded having to go to school the next day." He took the decision to help struggling peers and created a "safe environment for LGBT students where they don't feel the need to self-harm or commit suicide." His petition to create a LGBT club/safe space earned 2,000 signatures and is now known as One Dowling Family.

Through his efforts, Jameson earned the Gold Matthew Shepard Scholarship sponsored by the Eychaner Foundation in Des Moines. However, Dowling administration refuses to present the scholarship at the annual senior awards dinner on May 5th. Jameson claims that they manipulated the rules multiple times and took to a Change.org petition, requesting that the school presents him the award this week. Even McCubbin took to social media and urged people to sign his petition.

The school sent a message to its faculty and media stating that they are "proud of all [our] senior students how have received awards and scholarships to further their education," and that they "do not allow organizations who are awarding the scholarship to attend and individually present the scholarship to the student." Furthermore, they are "pleased one of [our] students received the Matthew Shepard Award and he will be honored in the same manner as his classmates." The Eychaner Foundation claims that Dowling changed its policy in recent months to specifically "target" LGBT-associated scholarships.

Do you think Jameson should have his award presented at the awards ceremony? If you are a student like Jameson who has a passion for social action, community service, and helping others - or if you yourself identify with or support the LGBT community - check out our many scholarships to help fund your college dreams.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

With Tinder, you can find your future partner, land a hookup, or...earn a scholarship? A female junior at the University of Nebraska Oklahoma was awarded a scholarship and paid internship for defending her use of the mobile dating app.

After Shannon Workman's sorority, Chi Omega, found that she had a Tinder profile picture while rocking a T-shirt with their letters, she was called to a disciplinary meeting. They found the picture to be "disrespectful" and pushed for a "membership revocation," which Workman secretly recorded. Rather than go through an appeals process, Workman opted to left-swipe and bounce. After choosing to exercise her right to use the Tinder app and defy Chi Omega, Tinder CEO and Co-founder Sean Rad reached out to offer Workman a full tuition scholarship to finish her undergrad education. Additionally, she was offered a paid internship at the company because what she did "sends a very empowering message to young women and college students."

Though Tinder has been blamed for creating a modern hookup culture and creating a "dating apocalypse", Workman stated that she defends Tinder because "I don't think there's anything wrong with it. Some people use it for hookups but I don't, and a lot of great things happen through Tinder.” Tinder was started at USC, primarily through the sorority and fraternity realm - which is still the most active group on Tinder. Over 50 percent of users are ages 18 to 24, many of whom are women.

What're your thoughts on Tinder offering a scholarship to the student? You may have your own causes that you believe in - from social action and environmental activism, to simple community service, there are scholarships that award student’s leadership and passion for causes larger than themselves.

Going to college doesn't have to break the bank or saddle you with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. Check out the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search where you’ll discover you qualify for hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships in just a few minutes, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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by Susan Dutca

Colleges and universities have started to increase diversity amongst their student body and now, even their faculty. Or so they claim. There may be an increase in female and minority faculty, but according to one professor, there's one political group that "just doesn't make the cut".

The Higher Education Research Institute reports that only 12 percent of university faculty are right-leaning in their political views and identification. Most of these outliers are in engineering and similar professional schools. Only 5 percent of professors in the humanities and social sciences are right-of-center. In his article "The One Kind of Diversity Colleges Avoid" for the Wall Street Journal, Georgetown University Professor John Hasnas recounts seeing committees blatantly deny libertarian candidates, changing the description of the job position "when the best resumes appeared to be coming from applicants with right-of-center viewpoints," or even "dismissing candidates because of their association with conservative or libertarian institutions." While higher education institutions are reporting increased diversity, candidates who do not identify with the left-leaning majority are dismissed in a process that employs a political discrimination with which they are apparently more than comfortable.

Hasnas poses an important question: why limit diversity increase initiatives to genetic, cultural, or ethnic backgrounds? Sure, recruiting female and minority professors great in itself, but it can "perpetuate the left-wing stranglehold on the academy" when it belittles conservative and libertarian scholarship and only finds merit "with positions that are consistent with theirs."

Why might your professors' political ideologies matter? For one, a "diverse academic environment better prepares students for an increasingly diverse workforce," so why not include political diversity? Secondly, your education is coming from only one political perspective - how are you supposed to "pursue intellectual excellence," then? Dr. Lee Jussim, one of the founding members of Heterodox Academy touches on the many ways in which "leftwing politics distorts scholarship in the social sciences and humanities. From issues such as poverty in Africa to ISIS, "professors preach their anti-American judgements to students as 'final truths'... [they] represent their views and ideologies in ways that make it seemingly impossible for any reasonable person to disagree with. Essentially, if you don’t agree with "left-liberal thought" you're considered "ignorant, intolerant, and uneducated."

Do you think there should be a more equal ratio of liberal to conservative professors? Regardless of your personal political ideas, we have scholarships regardless of the direction to which you lean, and also for political science and education majors. Don't be LEFT out, do the RIGHT thing and do your financial homework today.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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Talk is Cheap. College Isn't.

New Policy to Eliminate Pell Grants, Federal Loans, Tuition Tax Credits

Feb 23, 2016

by Susan Dutca

Talk is cheap when it comes to politicians' promises, but one thing that remains expensive is a college education. From vetoing a scholarships bill that would free up $721 million for community colleges and scholarships for low-income students, to killing the Senate Bill 180 which would require the New Mexico Lottery to provide $41 million to a college scholarships fund there has been no resolution to the budget stalemate since July 1, 2015. New America Higher Education has one resolution: out with the old, in with the new. That means removing federal loans, federal tuition vouchers, Pell grants, and tuition tax credits.

In their policy paper, "Starting from Scratch: A New Federal and State Partnership in Higher Education," New America Higher Education expressed their vision to reconstruct and repair the "broken system of financing higher education." The team plans to scrap the archaic system and replace it with a "federal-state financial partnership" where the government would dole money to states, which would go to colleges and universities - taking into account important factors such as enrolled low-income students. Students would only have to pay their Expected Family Contribution (EFC) and the state would be held accountable for student outcomes such graduation rates and securing employment. In addition to lowering tuition, the cost of living expenses such as room and board, transportation, and childcare costs would be lowered.

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States would have to maintain their current funding as provided in their individual budgets, match federal funding by 25 percent, and be responsible for performance and costs. There would be a bonus to states that contribute more than expected and also, a bonus for colleges who enroll more than 25 percent of low-income students. What's the catch? The plan would cost roughly $38 billion annually, and states would have to contribute an additional $17.9 billion. The existing system has left about 7 million borrowers in default with their student loans and the report claims that "going to college has left them in a much worse position than if they had never enrolled."

The partisanship disaster continues as colleges and universities haven't received "operating money from the state since July 1," according to Celeste Bott of the Chicago Tribune. The MAP grant provides up to $5,000 in financial aid to students who demonstrate need, according to the Illinois Student Assistance Commission. Some claim the scholarships bill would snag money from social service providers who provide care for the state's "most vulnerable residents," or that states simply do not have the money to spend. Governor Rauner agrees that the school funding formula needs to be changed.

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Do you support New America's Higher Education proposal? Leave your thoughtful comments below. Don't wait another day - take advantage of the available scholarships and learn more about grants and financial aid today.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

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