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Scholarship Application Resources

You’ve completed your scholarship search. You’ve put together a list of the scholarships for which you plan to apply, making notes of deadlines, dollar amounts and official rules for each. You’ve requested letters of recommendation, located required information, printed applications and done everything you need to do to apply. Well, except for one thing: You still need to actually complete the scholarship application. At this point, even the most prepared students can break down, faced with the question of what they can put on this application form that will highlight their most positive attributes, impress scholarship providers and win them a scholarship award.

It’s a tricky process. Up until this point, most of your writing has been for teachers or perhaps your peers, groups you’ve gotten to know fairly well and who have spelled out fairly clear expectations for you. Now, you’re writing for a group of strangers who are possibly hundreds of miles away...but there are tools to help. Many scholarship providers are looking for very similar things in winning applications and if not, they tend to say so up front. If you keep these things in mind, you’ll stand a better chance of winning scholarships, even if you don’t necessarily have the very best credentials.

Scholarship Application Strategies

Over the years, the Scholarships.com team has compiled an extensive library of resources to help students create winning scholarship applications, relying on research and experience we’ve accrued thanks to our familiarity with scholarship providers and the scholarship awards process. After all, we do award multiple college scholarships each year and review the requirements of scholarship contests listed on our site. So take some time and read up on how to apply for scholarships, meet scholarship deadlines, master scholarship application etiquette and, of course, write a scholarship-worthy essay. These helpful hints and scholarship strategies should point you and your application in the right direction to create success.

Scholarship Information

When applying for scholarships, the more information you have available, the more smoothly the process will go. In order to get you started, we’ve put together some helpful scholarship information that should assist you in both your scholarship search and the scholarship application process. Whether you’re interested in finding available scholarship opportunities, completing a scholarship application, debunking scholarship myths or identifying scholarship scams, we have a resource page to help you out. We’ve even spoken with scholarship winners and scholarship reviewers to provide you with additional perspectives on crafting a winning scholarship application.

Other tips

In addition to those involved in the actual process of applying for scholarships, there are other steps you can take to improve your chances of winning scholarships. Being aware of where to find scholarships and what types of scholarships exist early on in your educational career can also help you when it comes time to apply. Research the scholarships available for students pursuing different levels of education and different majors, and make notes of the requirements for those that apply to you. Looking ahead to scholarship opportunities you can pursue later on in your education career can help you better plan how you will pay for school. The earlier you start thinking about college and college scholarships, the more time you have to prepare and position yourself for success. By putting together and following a high school action plan as a freshman or sophomore, you will find the scholarship application process much easier as a junior or senior. Participating in extracurricular activities, following a rigorous plan of study and preparing adequately for standardized tests can all help you maximize your chances not only of getting into your dream college, but of earning some scholarship money along the way.

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