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Winning Scholarships: Attention to Detail Will Pay Off

For students looking to win scholarships, attention to detail is key. That means reading and following the instructions of each scholarship for which you apply, double-checking and proofreading everything you submit to the provider, and keeping your profile information on Scholarships.com up-to-date. Putting in the extra effort to dot every “i” and cross every “t” might sound painful, but trust us – attention to detail pays off. Here are ways that paying attention to detail helps ensure the best possible chance of winning scholarships.

Update Your Profile

If your GPA increases or you take up a new activity, make sure your profile at Scholarships.com reflects this. Maybe you have changed your mind about the college you want/plan to attend or the major you will study there. Any of these things might mean you now qualify for scholarships you didn’t when you first conducted your search. Even if nothing has significantly changed, Scholarships.com is constantly adding new scholarships for which you might qualify and which may not have been in your initial search results.

Review Instructions from Scholarship Provider

Winning scholarships often depends upon the applicant thoroughly reading and following the scholarship application guidelines and rules. Read the instructions and official rules very carefully, making certain to follow each instruction to the letter. Though it is possible some providers may overlook a minor infraction, don’t waste what time you’ve already invested by neglecting this step, as it could be the deciding factor in whether you are awarded a scholarship.

Proofread Your Writing

Imagine handing in an essay with spelling mistakes in class. Now imagine doing that when there’s money on the line. Scholarship providers expect students to use proper grammar and spelling in all of their written materials. When the competition is tight, one misspelled word in a scholarship essay could make all the difference. And don’t neglect spelling while filling out forms. You wouldn’t want to apply for a scholarship with a typo in your email address or phone number; you might never know you won!

Double-Check All Your Materials Before Applying

Finally, some scholarship applications require specific supplemental information from applicants, including letters of recommendation, financial documents, transcripts, medical forms and official test scores. You don’t want to miss any of the material needed for your application – or worse, send it to the wrong provider! Before you hit that submit button or mail that envelope, double-check that you have everything you need for that particular scholarship.

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Last Reviewed: October 2020