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San Diego Community Foundation Common Scholarship Application

$5,000

February 01, 2019

Awards Available: See Description

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  • Scholarship Description
  • As the largest private non-university scholarship provider in the county, the Community Scholarship Program operates more than 160 funds and awarded in excess of $2.2 million to more than 1,000 students last year alone.

    Applicants must be legal residents of San Diego County. Residency is required for one year and is defined as the city and state where the applicant's or parents'/guardians' taxes are filed. Active military personnel and their dependents are the exceptions. Applicants must also have a minimum 2.0 GPA and have participated in community service, extracurricular activities, and/or work experience.

    For more information or to apply, please visit the scholarship provider's website.
  • Contact
  • Scholarship Committee
  • 2508 Historic Decatur Road
  • Suite 200
  • San Diego, CA 92106
  • scholarships@sdfoundation.org
  • tel: 619-814-1343
  • fax: 619-239-1710

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MATTHEW H  on 1/28/2018 11:27:46 PM

Hello, my name is Matthew Herrera and I am applying for this scholarship because I will not be able to afford a Civil Engineering degree without financial assistance. I am the first one in my family to pursue a college education. I know that college is a huge expense, and realize that my mother won’t be able to pay to send me; therefore, I’m trying my best to earn my way through college myself. My mother is a home healthcare provider, and even though she works hard she cannot fund any of my college education. I have been carrying a strenuous course load as a junior and senior in high school to prepare academically for my next step towards getting a degree. I am taking college classes in high school, as the tuition is less expensive. Any time that I have left after my part time job at Footlocker as a sales associate and school commitments, I have spent towards filling out scholarships, as they will be necessary for my success. Although I have shown excellence throughout high school in extracurricular activities and with my academics, financially I am lacking.

Mohammed T  on 1/9/2016 8:44:10 PM

My name is Mohammed, I'd rather to be called Moe, I am originally from the Middle East. I came to the U.S about three years now. I escaped the civil war in Iraq. I was threatened to death so I decided to leave my precious five sisters and a diabetic father. I never could realize what my goal is, what my mission is, or why I am here? This nagging question was in my head all the time. I was born in a poor family my father who has a chronic diseases and five orphan sisters. I knew when I was seven that my life is going to be very tough. I still remember hearing my dad saying why God did you give me six children? I always felt that I was a mistake and burden on his shoulder, I wished many times to be vanished from this life. people in my home country were killing each other for so many non-valid reasons. I decided to escape and find a better way of living so that I can help my family and my sick dad. My immigration journey was so long, I was transferring from country to another. I experienced all kind of bad things, homelessness, hunger and depression. After waiting four years in Jordan as a refugee, my application was accepted by the immigration department of the US. When I came here, I did not speak any English, I was so afraid and lost. I did not have friends, or family or relatives. I was completely by myself. I had such a rough time that words can not describe it. I joined ESL classes at Continuing Education and was going to school everyday for twelve hours. I laterally lived there for about two years until I learned the language. After the language barriers were conquered I needed to find a job so that I can live independently without government assistance. and I did find a job with goodwill industries as a job coach. I supervise and coach fourteen clients who are either mentally or physically disabled. The only thing that helped finding this job was my experience back home in this field, I used to work in an asylum hospitals. I did so many things, feeding, bat

Sebastian C  on 10/16/2015 12:43:50 PM

This scholarship is closed right now.

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