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Scholarships.com Scholarship Winners

Resolve to Evolve Scholarship Winners

The Resolve to Evolve Scholarship (R2E) is about more than just making resolutions - it’s about making suggestions for change and furthering our own evolution. The idea behind R2E is to urge young people to offer workable solutions to problems facing the country, whether that’s the state of higher education today or the current administration’s tasks for the future, rather than pointing fingers or finding fault with a given administration or organization. The winners receive college scholarships ranging from $1,000 to $2,000 and also have their essays forwarded to officials who have the power to potentially act upon the winning essays’ suggestions.

R2E Winners by Year

Area of Study Scholarship Winners

From 2008 to 2010, Scholarships.com offered scholarships to students planning to pursue careers in 13 different areas of study. The Scholarships.com "Fund Your Future" Area of Study College Scholarships were based on just a handful of criteria: citizenship, college major, year of attendance and a brief scholarship essay. Applicants were asked to describe what influenced them to pursue a career in their intended major and winners were chosen based on essay responses of 250 to 350 words.

Though Scholarships.com no longer offers the Area of Study Scholarships, we still seek to help ambitious, innovative and compassionate students further their educations and achieve their college goals by listing numerous major-based awards in our database. If you will be attending college as an undergraduate student in the coming academic year, complete a Scholarships.com profile today to find awards based on your intended major.

Area of Study Winners by Year

The "Tell A Friend" Scholarship Sweepstakes

As a Scholarships.com member, you have free access to a customized scholarship search, detailed financial aid information, an organized college search, standardized test study guides and more. Like what you see? Spread the word about Scholarships.com to your friends through our "Tell A Friend" Scholarship and you'll have a chance to win money for college - $1,000 for you and $500 for one of your buddies! Just enter your email and password to obtain a personalized referral link. Then take that link and blog it, tweet it, email it, IM it or Facebook it and for every one of your friends who creates a profile on our site by clicking your link, you will be entered to win a $1,000 award. There’s no limit as to how many people you can send your link to and if you win, one of your friends will be chosen at random to win $500.

"Tell A Friend" Winners

Latest College & Financial Aid News

$100 Million Grainger Gift Garners New School Name at U of I

April 17, 2019

by Susan Dutca

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's engineering school will soon be called the "Grainger College of Engineering" after receiving another $100 million gift from The Grainger Foundation. The Grainger donation is the largest amount ever gifted to a public university to rename a college. [...]

Essay Mills Providing a "Side Door" for College Students

April 9, 2019

by Susan Dutca

Thirteen parents and one coach charged in the "Operation Varsity Blues" college cheating scandal will plead guilty in accordance with plea agreements. While elite parents implicated in the admissions scandal cheated to help their children get into college, there is a growing concern about how students, in general, may be cheating their way through college; specifically by buying ghostwritten essays online. [...]

Auctioning Off College Admissions Seats?

April 2, 2019

by Susan Dutca

Why not have schools auction off college seats to the highest bidder? The question was posed by a senior vice president at the Harvard Management Company on his public LinkedIn page amid the recent national college admissions cheating scandal. According to Michael Cappucci, it is simply "an honest question." He goes on to ask, "Why do we have a system where wealthy parents have to make shady payments to even more shady intermediaries to get their kids into college?" The post, which has since been removed but still drew much online anger was authored by Cappucci who is "not a top official" at the company; many people still presumed Harvard is connected to his idea, according to Inside Higher Ed, but Harvard was quick to distance itself from the LinkedIn post. [...]

Last Reviewed: April 2019