Freshman Year

Academics must be a top priority. College may seem far off, but it’s never too early to start off high school right. Take on as heavy of an academic load as you can handle. The grades you earn your freshman year will be included in your final high school GPA.

  • Select high school courses with a high school guidance counselor, and confirm that classes will contribute to college requirements.
  • Discuss academic plans for the next four years.
  • Consider enrolling in algebra or geometry classes and a foreign language for both semesters (most colleges have math and foreign language requirements).
  • Research colleges of interest.
  • Discuss college with older friends and family.
  • Talk to your parents about planning for college expenses. Continue or begin a savings plan for college.
  • Get involved. Involvement in extracurricular activities can help develop skills that classrooms may never teach.

Latest College & Financial Aid News

Another College Cyber Attacked, Hackers Demand $2M Ransom

July 16, 2019

by Susan Dutca-Lovell

Monroe College's IT system was hacked last week, disabling many of its technology systems and platforms as hackers demanded $2 million ransom in Bitcoin to restore access. Faculty, students and staff members were locked out of the college's websites but continued to attend class and hand in homework, regardless. [...]

Proposed Pell Grant Expansion for Short-Term Training Programs

July 9, 2019

by Susan Dutca-Lovell

Lawmakers are considering extending Pell Grants to people who pursue short-term training in order to land better jobs, faster. Federal student aid in the form of Pell Grants can currently be used for college degrees and qualifying certificate programs. [...]

3 Women Charged in $1M Student Financial Aid Fraud

July 2, 2019

by Susan Dutca-Lovell

Three San Bernardino County women who have been accused of stealing $1 million in federal financial aid from Fullerton college, in California, have been arrested by the U.S. Justice Department and are charged with various counts of mail and wire fraud. The scheme involved enrolling hundreds of mainly non-existent students, successfully applying for grants and loans and pocketing the money. [...]

Last Reviewed: July 2019