Freshman Year

Academics must be a top priority. College may seem far off, but it’s never too early to start off high school right. Take on as heavy of an academic load as you can handle. The grades you earn your freshman year will be included in your final high school GPA.

  • Select high school courses with a high school guidance counselor, and confirm that classes will contribute to college requirements.
  • Discuss academic plans for the next four years.
  • Consider enrolling in algebra or geometry classes and a foreign language for both semesters (most colleges have math and foreign language requirements).
  • Research colleges of interest.
  • Discuss college with older friends and family.
  • Talk to your parents about planning for college expenses. Continue or begin a savings plan for college.
  • Get involved. Involvement in extracurricular activities can help develop skills that classrooms may never teach.

Last Edited: September 2015

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