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Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant

Grants do not have to be repaid. There are grants exclusively for certain populations, and to honor particular circumstances. The Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant honors those in the U.S. armed forces who lost their lives in Iraq or Afghanistan after 9/11 by providing college funding to their children. Eligibility for this grant is determined by the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and specific requirements. The IASG is unique because students who are eligible for the Pell Grant based on their Expected Family Contribution are not eligible for the award.

What is an IASG Grant?

The Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grant (IASG) is a federal grant for students whose parent or guardian was member of the U.S. armed forces and died in service in Iraq or Afghanistan after September 11, 2011.

Who Is Eligible for the IASG?

Undergraduates who were is less than 24 years old and enrolled at least part-time in higher education at the time of their parent/guardian's death are eligible for the IASG. If a students’ Expected Family Contribution (EFC) makes them eligible for the Pell Grant, they are not eligible for this award. Students’ are allowed to meet some Pell requirements, other than what is based off the EFC. Eligibility and the EFC are determined by the FAFSA. Because award recipients cannot qualify for Pell, the maximum IASG amount is equal to the maximum Pell amount.

How Much Money Can I Receive?

The IASG grant award equals the maximum Pell Grant award for that year based on eligibility. Awards cannot exceed the cost of attendance for the award year. The maximum Federal Pell Grant award for the 2015-2016 award year is $5,775.

Due to sequestration, award amounts distributed on or after October 1, 2014 and before October, 2015 must be reduced by 7.3% from the original amount. Additionally, any IASG disbursed on or after October 1, 2015 and before October 1, 2016 must be reduced by 6.8%.

IASG Grant disbursement is the same as the Federal Pell Grant. The college applies your grant money to tuition, fees, and room and board for students who live on-campus. You can choose whether the money comes by check, cash, credits your bank account, or other method.

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Last Reviewed: July 2019