Scholarship News

Coronavirus News Update for Students, Families, Colleges


March 31, 2020 3:27 PM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
From student loans to college athletics, Scholarships.com is keeping you updated on all of the latest information on the coronavirus pandemic and its impact on high school and higher education. If you're tired of reading about COVID-19, take a break by checking out your latest scholarship matches and earning money for college here.

From student loans to college athletics, Scholarships.com is keeping you updated on all of the latest information on the coronavirus pandemic and its impact on high school and higher education. If you're tired of reading about COVID-19, take a break by checking out your latest scholarship matches and earning money for college here.

Zoombombing

Imagine you are in a Zoom meeting with your classmates, peers, and professor when someone randomly intrudes - spewing racist, misogynistic or vulgar content. Such was the unfortunate case during an Arizona State University online Zoom meeting, as well as other schools conducting online learning amid the COVID-19 outbreak.

This new technological threat - coined "Zoombombing" - is occurring during online meetings and course-hosting platforms, and the 'bombs' typically take "the form of racist vitriol or pornographic content shared with the group by an unwelcome user," according to Inside Higher Ed. As a result, professors are researching methods to tightly control their Zoom meetings.

Zoom also posted a blog post detailing ways in which to keep out would-be crashers, and the FBI weighed in, recommending the following in hopes of preventing "Zoombombing":

  • Don't make meetings public. Zoom allows users to make meetings private by requiring a meeting password or using a waiting room feature to control who's admitted.
  • Don't share a link to the meeting on a public social media post. Send the link to participants directly.
  • Change the screen-sharing option in Zoom to "host only."
  • Ask people to use the latest updated version of Zoom.
  • Ensure your organization's telework policy addresses requirements for information security.

CARES Act Emergency Funding for Institutions

Of the $2 trillion coronavirus relief package emergency funding, nearly $14 billion of it will be given to higher education. The American Council on Education created a simulation to show an estimate of where the money will go for general planning.

Roughly $12.5 billion of the emergency funding will go to institutions based on a breakdown of 75 percent going toward the full-time enrollment equivalent of Pell Grant recipients and 25 percent for the full-time equivalent enrollment of students who don't receive Pell Grants. Find the breakdown for the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act here.

Student Loan Tax Breaks

Congress is set to pass a $2.2 trillion stimulus bill which includes a one-time tax break this year for annual employer contributions of up to $5,250 toward their employees' student loan debt. As a result, companies have started offering student loan payments as a benefit for both current employees and new hires.

NCAA Division I Athletics

In response to the coronavirus pandemic, Division I athletes on spring teams are allowed to compete for an additional season and teams can provide scholarships for more athletes than rules typically allow, according to the National Collegiate Athletic Association. It will be up to institutions to decide whether to provide the financial aid, and how much. College senior athletes who return for the upcoming season are not guaranteed to retain the same scholarship they were awarded during this current season.

Higher education institutions will be able to extend the eligibility of all their spring athletes - not just college seniors - by one year. Baseball roster limits will also be increased. Only spring college athletes will be entitled to these extensions since their season were cut short due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Medical Students Graduating Early

In an effort to more quickly combat the COVID-19 pandemic, some medical schools will allow its students to graduate early so they can get to work as soon as possible. There will be guidelines for medical schools interested in participating in this initiative, which will include appropriate supervision since "the M.D. degree gives them the ability to have supervised practice, not independent practice." Furthermore, early medical school graduates will need a special license since they cannot have an independent license.

Student Loan Wage Garnishing

Ascendium has stopped garnishing wages, tax refunds or Social Security benefits to collect overdue student loan payments, and will not try to involuntarily collect payments for at least 60 days after March 26, according to Inside Higher Ed. Ascendium, the nation's largest student loan guarantor, also stopped contacting borrowers unless they are trying to resolve their debt and is refunding any money collected through messages it sent since March 13. The stimulus package recently passed by Congress also ordered a stop to involuntary collections.

Check back regularly on our News section to keep up to date on the latest information on the coronavirus and higher education.

College is expensive, Scholarships.com is completely free. Pay for your college education with as much free college scholarship money as possible. By applying to all the awards you qualify for, you can be sure to not miss a single opportunity in paying for your college expenses - including tuition, fees, room and board. Get matched to college scholarships instantly and start applying today by conducting a free college scholarship search at Scholarships.com.

Discuss

Share your thoughts and perhaps thousands of students will benefit from your unique insight on the subject!



If you can read this, don't touch the following fields


 
As a high school student in the midst of the standardized testing season and living through the COVID-19 pandemic, you may be wondering what the future holds for standardized test scores, AP courses, and the college admissions process. A recent survey conducted by The College Board revealed than 91 percent of 18,000 polled enrollees still want to take their AP tests. In fact, in 900 pages of comments responding to the AP survey, AP students begged to be allowed at least one championship bout with an AP test.

Coronavirus Impact on SAT, ACT, and AP Testing

March 26, 2020 2:56 PM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
As a high school student in the midst of the standardized testing season and living through the COVID-19 pandemic, you may be wondering what the future holds for standardized test scores, AP courses,
Negotiations and proposals for an economic stimulus package are being mulled over by lawmakers, ones that will ultimately affect school and education funding. Currently, student-loan borrowers are able enter forbearance on their student loans for 60 days without accruing interest. The U.S. Department of Education will also suspend student loan payments by borrowers who are over 31 days delinquent. The White House has already announced that it will waive the interest on federal student loan payments. Here are some of the recent developments in proposed relief for students, colleges and universities as part of the COVID-19 stimulus plan:

Coronavirus Stimulus Package: Higher Ed Edition

March 24, 2020 11:51 AM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
Negotiations and proposals for an economic stimulus package are being mulled over by lawmakers, ones that will ultimately affect school and education funding. Currently, student-loan borrowers are
There's no better time to apply for scholarships than when you aren't inundated with school, athletic and other responsibilities. That means that this upcoming spring break is probably your best opportunity at applying for and winning scholarships!

Scholarships to Apply for Over Spring Break

March 10, 2020 2:45 PM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
There's no better time to apply for scholarships than when you aren't inundated with school, athletic and other responsibilities. That means that this upcoming spring break is probably your best
What's at the end of the rainbow? These March 2020 scholarships. We're adding more green to your college financial aid package this month - lucky you! Start off by browsing through our featured list of popular March scholarships or by completing a free profile to get instantly matched to opportunities for which you qualify. Either way, it's bound to be your lucky day!

Get Lucky with March 2020 Scholarships

March 6, 2020 1:24 PM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
What's at the end of the rainbow? These March 2020 scholarships. We're adding more green to your college financial aid package this month - lucky you! Start off by browsing through our featured list
As part of Financial Awareness Month this February, Scholarships.com is bringing you a list of the most common FAFSA mistakes made in hopes that you will avoid them as your file your FAFSA. If you intend on attending college between July 1, 2020 and June 30, 2021, we encourage you to fill out your FAFSA – ASAP. Here are some common FAFSA mistakes to avoid:

Common FAFSA Mistakes to Avoid

February 26, 2020 12:34 PM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
As part of Financial Awareness Month this February, Scholarships.com is bringing you a list of the most common FAFSA mistakes made in hopes that you will avoid them as your file your FAFSA. If you
The U.S. Department of Education's StudentAid.gov website debuted a variety of new tools, including a personalized loan simulator, new alert and notification system, and aid summary tool. These enhancements are some of the first of several upgrades to the website that will roll out in 2020, delivering on U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' promise to modernize and personalize the customer experience with federal student aid, according to the news release. Here are the latest tools released and what they mean:

StudentAid.gov Debuts New Online Tools

February 25, 2020 10:59 AM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
The U.S. Department of Education's StudentAid.gov website debuted a variety of new tools, including a personalized loan simulator, new alert and notification system, and aid summary tool. These
In an effort to make college fair, Democratic Presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg is calling for an end to giving college alumni's children preference when it comes to getting into college.

Calls to End Legacy Preferences for College Admissions

February 21, 2020 2:49 PM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
In an effort to "make college fair," Democratic Presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg is calling for an end to giving college alumni's children preference when it comes to getting into college.