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3 Strikes and You’re Out - Disruptive Students to be Suspended, Expelled


October 10, 2017 11:12 AM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
The University of Wisconsin may soon implement a policy that would suspend, and eventually expel, students who repeatedly disrupt campus speakers with opposing views. The policy also states that protests that disrupt the ability of others to listen or engage with free speech will not be allowed and shall be subject to sanction.

The University of Wisconsin may soon implement a policy that would suspend, and eventually expel, students who repeatedly disrupt campus speakers with opposing views. The policy also states that protests that disrupt the ability of others to listen or engage with free speech will not be allowed and "shall be subject to sanction."

On Friday, The University of Wisconsin's Board of Regents approved a 3-strike policy; students who are twice caught disrupting another person's free speech will be suspended for a minimum of one semester. Students who are disruptive for a third time will be expelled. The policy qualifies disruptive behavior as "violent or other disorderly misconduct that materially and substantially disrupts the free expression of others."

System President Ray Cross stated that, "Perhaps the most important thing we can do as a university is to teach students how to engage and listen to those with whom they differ...If we don't show students how to do this, who will?..." A similar policy already exists at the University of Virginia, where "any person who interrupts an invited speaker or event [is] requested to leave and removed if they refuse to leave or persist in interrupting any speaker or event." In 2016, University of Wisconsin-Madison students shouted down campus speaker Ben Shaprio, while also "trading obscene gestures." In the span of a few months, there have been violent protests at University of California-Berkeley's campus, and the school had to recently cancel an appearance by Milo Yiannopoulus.

Some critics believe this course of action will one "chill and suppress free speech on [this] campus and all campuses" or that the "policy doesn't clearly define what type of conduct is considered disruptive." In your opinion, should students be given warnings or punished for their disruptive or violent responses to campus speakers? Why or why not?

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Discuss

Share your thoughts and perhaps thousands of students will benefit from your unique insight on the subject!



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Crystal G  on  1/31/2018 10:44:25 AM commented:

Your best bet if you are opposed to that speaker's views is to leave, or don't attend that event in the first place. Especially if you're not required to.

Emily  on  11/14/2017 10:35:36 AM commented:

Now the behavior of students is disgusting. They do not listen to anyone, neither teachers, nor parents. Here https://www.cmu.edu/teaching/designteach/teach/problemstudent.html is very well described. I also have many examples of the same behavior. From the most harmless to disgusting deeds. My friend, for example, lies to the teacher and does not do homework. Instead, he orders here https://coolessay.net/ writing essays, in the firm other homework. And the teacher believes and gives him good marks. Another comrade does not attend an educational institution in general. He does not want to study, he is forced by his parents and teachers. This behavior is very much in our time. This is everyone's fault, parents and teachers, too. It is necessary to think about solving this problem.

Cole H.  on  10/22/2017 8:25:02 AM commented:

I'm glad that The Universities of Wisconsin and of Virginia are protecting students from people trying to disrupt their education that is being payed for with a lot of money.

Linda J.  on  10/17/2017 2:26:28 PM commented:

I think this is a good idea. Why is it that students think when they speak, everyone should listen, but when someone has an opposing viewpoint, students think the appropriate action is to shout and disrupt that speaker. This is childish of the students. You wonder if the parents of the students agree with this action. We are not teaching our children anything if they aren't made to respect other people's viewpoints. Students are so great on "diversion and equality" but it ends when you don't agree with them.

Eroll  on  10/11/2017 10:47:49 AM commented:

Good!!

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