College Weed Laws at Odds with Some State Laws


December 19, 2017 12:50 PM
by Susan Dutca
Just because marijuana has been legalized in some states, doesn't mean that it has become legal at colleges in those states. Colleges could face a huge penalty if they are caught infringing on the law.

Just because marijuana has been legalized in some states, doesn't mean that it has become legal at colleges in those states. Colleges could face a huge penalty if they are caught infringing on the law.

Due to the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act, some college administrators are reluctant to allow marijuana on their campuses, for fear that the government could yank federal funding. Communications Manager of the Marijuana Policy Project Morgan Fox stated "marijuana is much safer than alcohol, and so much less trouble", but he also believes that "regardless of marijuana's legal status, colleges should treat marijuana like they treat alcohol in their own internal policies".

Marijuana was legalized last year in California, Massachusetts, Nevada and Maine, joining Colorado, Oregon, Alaska, Washington and the District of Columbia. Even at schools such as The University of California - which is one of the most liberal states in the country and where recreational cannabis is legal - marijuana is banned on campus. There is "no intent to change the policy," either.

The student government at the University of Maryland College Park lobbied for reduced punishments for possessing marijuana to "reflect the state's status as having made it a civil offense in 2014." This would basically mean that anyone 21 or older could be caught with possession of up to 10 grams of pot and just pay a fine, "akin to a speeding ticket." They also called for an end to drug testing, housing termination, suspension and expulsion for students over 21 found with pot or drug paraphernalia.

Those who do not support lifting sanctions, such as the university's health center, claim that there is research that documents the negative academic impact of cannabis use." Furthermore, "other harms associated with the use of marijuana include the development of psychiatric disorders and increased likelihood of other drug use."

Evidence shows that college students "take advantage of more liberal weed laws," such as in Oregon, where students are using more marijuana since it was legalized in 2015. Do you think that higher education institutions should allow the use of marijuana in states where marijuana has been legalized? Why or why not?

Getting more college financial aid doesn’t have to be a relentless search. Scholarships.com is totally free. Connect with our massive database of millions of college scholarships at any time by searching for awards in a variety of ways. Scholarships.com offers the quickest and easiest way to search for, apply to, and win college scholarships. Start making your college education affordable or perhaps even free, by conducting a free college scholarship search at Scholarships.com.

Discuss

Share your thoughts and perhaps thousands of students will benefit from your unique insight on the subject!



If you can read this, don't touch the following fields


 

Crystal G  on  9/4/2018 5:47:14 PM commented:

I don't think so. It's still harmful to the human body, no matter what you call it. And it smells so much worse than cigarettes. No one should have to breathe in toxic substances from cigarettes or other drugs without their consent. That is not okay. Secondhand smoke is just as fatal, if not more so, than picking up a cigarette or pot and smoking it yourself.

Roopram Meena  on  1/2/2018 9:35:15 PM commented:

Thank u

TJ Mcnew  on  12/29/2017 11:20:19 PM commented:

Coach teaching

A blind New York resident is suing 50 colleges nationwide over the accessibility of their websites. According to Jason Camacho, the colleges are in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act, as their websites are not accessible to people with disabilities. This is not the first time Camacho has sued higher education institutions over website accessibility.

Blind NY Resident Suing 50 US Colleges

December 11, 2018 11:56 AM
by Susan Dutca
A blind New York resident is suing 50 colleges nationwide over the accessibility of their websites. According to Jason Camacho, the "colleges are in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act,
Despite being voted the top choice for a fast-food restaurant last year at the college, Chick-fil-A will no longer be a restaurant franchise option at Rider University based on the company's record widely perceived to be in opposition to the LGBTQ+ community. The decision to remove Chick-fil-A as a new restaurant franchise option required a difficult assessment of competing interests.

Rider U to Ban Chick-fil-A Over Conservative Values

November 27, 2018 3:21 PM
by Susan Dutca
Despite being voted the top choice for a fast-food restaurant last year at the college, Chick-fil-A will no longer be a restaurant franchise option at Rider University "based on the company's record
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos recently proposed a Title IX overhaul for how colleges handle campus-based sexual misconduct. A key requirement would be that colleges allow both the accusers and accused to have advisers cross-examine the other party to ensure a more transparent, consistent and reliable process for campus hearings.

New Title IX Proposal a Victory for Due Process?

November 20, 2018 2:36 PM
by Susan Dutca
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos recently proposed a Title IX overhaul for how colleges handle campus-based sexual misconduct. A key requirement would be that colleges allow both the accusers and
Photo courtesy of The Nation

  Graduate student assistants across the nation are pushing for a $15 per hour stipend, which they believe is a minimum living wage. Graduate students have attributed the 29 percent stipend increase at Emory University to their successful campus advocacy.

Graduate Students' "Fight for $15"

October 30, 2018 12:51 PM
by Susan Dutca
Photo courtesy of The Nation Graduate student assistants across the nation are pushing for a $15 per hour stipend, which they believe is a "minimum living wage." Graduate students have
Harvard students and alumni will testify in support of Harvard during the admissions trial this week, defending its race-conscious admissions policy against claims that it discriminates against Asian-American applicants. The trial is the latest chapter in a lawsuit filed in 2014 by Students for Fair Admissions (SFFA).

Harvard University has been accused of balancing its undergraduate classes to ensure that it had admitted its desired share of students of each race and ethnicity and also for penalizing Asian-American applicants by systematically giving them lower scores on a metric admissions officers use to measure personality. Adam Mortara, a lawyer representing SFFA, stated that the university scores applicants in four categories: academic achievement, athletic ability, extracurriculars, and personality. While referencing admissions data, he concluded that, despite their higher academic performance, Asian-Americans are admitted at lower rates.

Harvard Supporters Back University in Admissions Trial

October 16, 2018 11:24 AM
by Susan Dutca
Harvard students and alumni will testify in support of Harvard during the admissions trial this week, defending its "race-conscious admissions policy" against claims that it discriminates against
An associate professor in security studies at Georgetown University who, last week, wished death and castration to GOP senators supporting confirmed Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh is no longer teaching but will be traveling internationally for university research.

Professor Sent Abroad After Posting Hateful Tweets

October 9, 2018 4:04 PM
by Susan Dutca
An associate professor in security studies at Georgetown University who, last week, wished "death and castration" to GOP senators supporting confirmed Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh is no