Home > Resources > College Prep > College Classes

College Classes

College classes are different from high school classes; that goes without saying. However, how exactly the two types of class differ seems to be a topic on which nobody can quite manage to agree. One high school teacher will swear that college is nothing but piles and piles of reading and memorization, while another might say that you can expect to primarily work on critical thinking and writing. The truth is everyone’s experience in college is different. Despite the differences, there are some things you can do to choose classes wisely and succeed in your college classes.

Fulfilling Requirements

When you’re choosing college classes, you may be disappointed to learn that many of your choices are dictated by your school or your department. Most colleges and universities have general education requirements that students will need to fulfill in order to graduate. Every college major will also have requirements for students, whether they’re merely taking a certain number of credits in certain subject areas, or whether a specific schedule of classes has been proscribed for students.

Whatever the case may be, many of your college classes will be required classes in at least some sense. This doesn’t mean these classes will necessarily be torturous to complete. If you’ve chosen your major and your college wisely, completing requirements can be an entertaining and edifying experience. There will always be a few classes you dislike or even dread taking, though. Luckily, choosing classes wisely can help you get through these requirements.

If you can choose between several classes to fulfill requirements for your degree, it pays to do the research to see what options are available. Especially where humanities classes are concerned, truly interesting topics abound. If a class on Shakespeare and a class on comic books fulfill the same English requirement, the latter may very well be more enjoyable and may capture your attention in a way that translates to higher grades.

Even if you’re severely restricted in the titles of the courses you need to take, your choice of professor could make the difference between a great semester and a terrible one. Research professors who teach the classes you want to or need to take and see who has gotten good reviews, as well as whose teaching style is likely to complement your learning style. If you’re choosing classes within your major or minor, taking classes from a professor whose academic interests align with yours may also be a good idea.

Reasonable Expectations

When choosing and completing college classes, be sure you have reasonable expectations of yourself, your professors and your school. Most students do not have superpowers like being able to successfully complete an entire year’s worth of schoolwork in one semester, so it’s wise not to attempt too many courses or too many difficult courses at once. Push yourself and be sure you’re successfully completing enough classes to graduate according to the timeline you’ve established for yourself, but don’t strain yourself and hurt your grades by taking on too much work at once.

Similarly, be aware of your scheduling and time management needs where your college classes are concerned. Give yourself enough time to get to each class in a timely manner, and also give yourself enough time to actually wake up in the morning before you need to be anywhere other than your bed. Being chronically absent or late isn’t acceptable in high school, and it’s not a good idea in college, either.

On Campus vs. Online

If you have a busy schedule or find your learning style is well-suited to online classes, you may want to consider completing all or part of your coursework through online learning. Online degree programs are rapidly gaining popularity, both through online universities and through distance-learning programs based on traditional campus. As a result, regardless of the type of school you attend, you likely have the option of taking one or more class online.

There are qualities to look for when finding a good online course, ranging from the objective of the class to the resources and support systems available for students enrolled. Discipline and understanding can both be problems in online classes, so a course that will keep you on task and make sure you’re not falling behind can be a good start to online learning. Even in a good online course, you are still largely on your own when it comes to making sure you understand the material and complete the work. In order to succeed in an online course, you’ll need to make sure you’re able to commit to the course, manage your time, ask questions and communicate through writing. If you’re able to stay on top of your online courses, they can be a great way of completing college classes while maintaining a flexible schedule.

Latest College & Financial Aid News

80 Prestige Schools Team up to Redesign Common Application

September 29, 2015

by Susan Dutca

In less than a month the world of higher education has moved forward with changes to the traditional approaches in the college application and admission process - first, with the simplified and updated FAFSA to appear in October 2016 and now, with 80 colleges and universities building a platform to streamline the application process that they hope to debut in summer of 2016. The goal is to get [...]

5 Essential College Reads

September 28, 2015

by Christina Zhou

One of the things necessary for success in college is being a well-rounded person. No matter what career field you choose to enter, reading and writing is essential. Therefore, every college student should strive to read a wide variety of literature. Below are several popular and timeless books that every college student should read: Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë. A classic [...]

Fixing FAFSA: Acquiring Financial Aid to be Easier, Quicker

September 25, 2015

by Susan Dutca

If you've ever had to fill out a FAFSA for college, you may have felt as though you need an accounting degree to understand it, much less complete it. With over 130 questions and averaging 30 minutes to complete, the complexity and tedium of filing for financial aid has been a barrier for students in attending college or receiving the financial aid for which they qualify. The Department of [...]

Follow Us:

facebook twitter rss feed