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Parents’ Guide to College Requirements

Take advantage of the many years of advice you received when it comes to your child’s college preparation, from the logistics to the particulars.

Look Good on Paper

Many colleges request a resume with every application because it highlights students’ honors, achievements and interests in a very simple and readable manner. If your child does not have one, help them create one, as it will give you a better idea what your child will need to work on to be an attractive candidate for admission.

Know Your Deadlines

The saying goes that if you’re early, you’re on time and if you’re on time, you’re late. This should be your mantra when it comes to college deadlines. Often, the earlier your child applies, the better off they’ll be, but don’t let them procrastinate and especially don’t let them be LATE late.

To Edit or Not to Edit?

The essay is a huge part of a student’s college application so you should do everything in your power to ensure your child’s is professional and eloquent, right? If you feel the need to edit and rewrite every word your child has written because you think it’s what the admissions committee would want to see, then slowly step away from the application.

Early Decision, Early Action and Regular Admission: What’s the Difference?

Any parent helping their child through the admissions process has likely heart these three terms discussed. It absolutely matters which one they apply for. Being early is usually a good thing, but sometimes being on time can be even better, depending on the situation; college admissions are no different. Students who apply early sometimes have better chances of acceptance than they would through the regular admission process but if a student is unsure that a particular school is their top choice, regular decision is encouraged.

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Last Reviewed: June 2020