Skip Navigation LinksHome > Resources > Study Skills

Study Skills

Study Skills

One of the most important elements of college success is developing good study skills to meet the challenges presented by a new learning environment. Good study habits will make your life easier and will prepare you to excel in future endeavors, whether you are a high school freshman or a college senior.

The following are some of the study skills that we’ve found most effective. High school and college students will hopefully be well-served by practicing them.

Know Your Enemy

Your approach to each essay, test or other assignment will depend on who is giving the assignment and what its stated purpose is. Beyond having some rough idea of the genre in which you’re working (for example, having different approaches to papers for an English class versus a science class), be aware that specific professors and specific courses will have different requirements that you need to fulfill.

Even standardized tests come with different expectations. Tests like the ACT, SAT, GRE, and LSAT shouldn’t be approached blindly, even if you’ve taken every other standardized test under the sun. Knowing what the questions will look like and what the test purports to measure will help you complete it more successfully.

Know Yourself

Your study habits will be influenced by your past experiences and your natural inclinations. Perhaps you’re extremely laid back and easygoing, or perhaps you know yourself to be a chronic procrastinator. If any of these is the case, you may need to push yourself more than someone who naturally wants to complete all tasks immediately and accurately. Regardless of your habits, be honest about your weaknesses and strengths and develop a plan to best work with them.

Get Organized

One of the most overlooked parts of attending college, financial aid is vital to those who need assistance affording a college education. Before taking out thousands in loans, students should submit a FAFSA (applications may be found at FAFSA.ed.gov), complete a free college scholarship search, and visit a school financial aid office to find out about college-based assistance.

Prioritize

Sometimes, you just won’t be able to give every task the attention it deserves. This is when you will have to decide which assignments to focus the most attention on and which to put less time into or put on hold for now. There are any number of factors that can go into making this decision, depending on what your college goals are and what your goals are for that course.

Having some idea how to quantify how important each element of your life is to your grades and your goals is an important step in the process of prioritizing. For example, if you’re a high school senior applying to competitive schools that weigh standardized test scores heavily, you are going to want to clear your schedule for your SAT or ACT test day and make sure a large assignment or an outside activity doesn’t cut into your study time or sleep time before the test.

Last Edited: May 2015

Latest College & Financial Aid News

Seven Tips for Repaying Your Student Loans

by Suada Kolovic

If you're a recent college graduate, chances are you’ll have to start paying off your student loans sooner than you think. And even with the economy in a slump, don’t expect a free pass on not paying your loans. Are you starting to panic? Well, don’t! There’s a ton of advice out there to help students stay on track and courtesy of the U.S. News and World Report, here are seven tips for repaying [...]

Is Harvard Biased Against Asian American Applicants?

by Suada Kolovic

Applying to some of the top universities in the country is undoubtedly unnerving given the quality of the applicants and the impossibly low acceptance rates. But what if because you were an Asian-American student seeking admission, you were held to an even higher standard? Well, that is what a coalition of 64 organizations is claiming. According to the compliant, which was filed [...]

Incoming University of Texas President Turned Down $1 Million Salary

by Suada Kolovic

Understanding how to negotiate your salary is a skill that you’ll hone over your career. Normally, many new employees want to negotiate for higher salaries...but for some, that's not always the case: Incoming University of Texas at Austin President Gregory Fenves turned down a $1 million salary because he thought it was too much. Say what? According to the Austin [...]

Follow Us:

facebook twitter rss feed