Blog

by Susan Dutca

Don't have the necessary funds to pay your college tuition? That may be a problem if you plan to attend colleges or universities like Haverford College, where they will suspend their admissions office's "need blind" application review policy, at least temporarily. Dropping the commitment to need-blind admissions is a concern among the fairly short list of private colleges; those that historically have had large enough endowments to be able to offer all students admission without the need for the student and/or parent to take out student loans. Some students have spoken out claiming that this isn't a form of diversifying but rather, "financially viable diversity."

Haverford claims the "changes will be modest" and applicants will be reviewed and admitted as they were in the past - without regard to financial need. Once the college depletes its available funds, the last 10-15 students admitted "will be those who can be admitted without going outside the aid budget." Haverford already anticipates it will run out of money before admitting the entire class but students believe that "there will always be money for things [we] value." The college will maintain its commitment to low-income students, according to the Dean of Admissions.

Other changes in admissions include an increase in class size by roughly seven students yearly; without affecting the "prized" faculty-student ratio. Haverford's President Kimberly W. Benston wrote that the changes are due to "financial challenges created by shifts in the college's demographics and the growing financial need of students in recent years" as well as the “economic downturn that hit in 2008."

Haverford is considered a very well-heeled private institution, with competitive admissions and an endowment "just shy of a half a billion dollars." Do you think this is the best possible way to remain within budget while admitting the incoming class? Is there a better way? Leave us your thoughtful comments below.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (0)

by Susan Dutca

California's Antelope Valley School District banned atheist scholarships from being listed on student publications and must now pay $10,000 in legal fees. They claimed it would upset parents, "promote anti-religious expression," and have "argumentative" and "aggressive undertones." Freethinkers instead saw it as anti-atheist prejudice.

The district was sued by FFRF for refusing to allow college-bound seniors to compete for $17,950 in scholarships from the Freedom from Religion Foundation and $1,750 in scholarships from the Antelope Valley Freethinkers. According to The Friendly Atheist, the scholarship essay prompts are not the least bit aggressive but rather allow students to "develop opinions based on science and reason in contrast to faith and dogma' by writing about their experiences when "objecting to or raising logical- or evidence-based challenges to statements of faith of dogma within their family, school, or Antelope Valley at large."

For students who may face ridicule, harassment, or punishment for speaking up against religion in the classroom, at school events, in government, or their own homes, the FFRF's prompts are: "Young, bold and nonbelieving: Challenges of being a nonbeliever of color" and "Why I'm Good Without God: Challenges of being a young nonbeliever."

While the atheist scholarships were banned, the district accepted scholarships from other religious groups, such as the Church of Scientology, which "solicited religious speech, required applicants to be religious, and dealt with the historically controversial topics of homosexuality and guns."

In your opinion, do you think the schools were right in banning the scholarships? Why or why not? Leave us your thoughtful comments below. If you are looking for scholarships based on your personal faith, check out our extensive list of religious scholarships.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (13)

by Susan Dutca

Students at Vanderbilt University will soon have their sex-reassignment surgeries covered under a new student health-care plan. Without insurance, many individuals are unable to pay for hormones, surgeries and counseling necessary for the transition. From sex-reassignment to breast augmentation, college and universities are taking steps to make their students feel comfortable and more respected.

The desire for more trans inclusivity does not come without opposition from the Tennessee's Republican-led legislature. Rep. Diane Black released her statement, criticizing the "painfully obvious lack of common sense," since "[our] institutions of higher learning exist to graduate students who are career ready and are prepared to compete in the global economy, not to play politics by providing insurance coverage of medically unnecessary procedures while raking in federal grants." Schools such as Ohio University, which already have expanded transgender health coverage, pay an additional $120,000 yearly.

Medicare lifted its ban on coverage for sex-reassignment surgery in May of 2014. Since then, 72 colleges and universities have implemented the plan. Vanderbilt will cover services such as hormone-replacement therapy and other transgender-related operations. Schools with existing policies, such as the University of Arizona, pay for hormone therapy, orchiectomy, and genital reconstructive surgery. VU will be the first university in Tennessee to offer surgery coverage, making it a leader in the movement.

Transgender students have voiced their discontent with schools unwilling to accommodate their health needs. RJ Robles, a transgender graduate student at Vanderbilt Divinity School, was devastated when he found out that breast augmentation was not covered by student health insurance. "I was going to basically have to put my transition on hold," he claimed. Robles is "really proud of the Vanderbilt community for stepping up" and feels like trans students are finally being "celebrated, valued, respected, heard and seen."

According to Cynthia Cyrus, Vice Provost for Learning and Residential Affairs at Vanderbilt, the decision came to pass in a "relatively non-controversial" manner and "not deeply debated in any way." Students at VU claim that there was no debate to begin with and there "was no organized opposition to this policy because [the students] had no idea that such a policy was even being considered." VU later admitted to Fox 17 that the decision (for now) is merely a "political statement," but a "reasonable move in the right direction."

In your opinion, should colleges and universities be covering students' sex-reassignment surgeries, as well as cosmetic surgeries?

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (17)

by Susan Dutca

South Carolina State University will be able to offer considerably more financial aid to future business majors thanks to the $2.5 million Earvin "Magic"" Johnson Endowed Scholarship Fund. The funds are established to help business students at the historically black college.

Johnson decided to embark on the educational endeavor a year ago, when he visited the Orangeburg campus. Since then, he's "worked to develop meaningful ways to contribute to its success". According to Johnson, the scholarship fund will "continue the legacy of our nations historically black colleges and universities". Scholarship details will be released this weekend during a fundraising event in Washington.

You may feel out of touch with famous Hollywood actors, professional athletes, or singers and songwriters, but there are scholarships funded by such people who are interested in giving back to future generations of scholars and stars. Here's a list of other scholarships funded by well-known celebrities:

  1. Rihanna's Clara Lionel Foundation Scholarship

    Deadline: August 10
    Maximum Award: $200,000

  2. BMI John Lennon Scholarship

    Deadline: December 1
    Maximum Award: $10,000

  3. BSU Letterman Telecommunications Scholarship

    Deadline: April 4
    Maximum Award: $10,000

  4. Earl Woods Scholarship Program

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: Varies

  5. Jimi Hendrix Scholarship Fund

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: $5,000

  6. Aerosmith Scholarship

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: Varies

  7. Janet Jackson/Rhythm National Scholarship

    Deadline: Varies
    Maximum Award: $5,000

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (2)

by Susan Dutca

Bruce Leslie has already come under fire for some controversial "calls" he's made and now he's been busted phone-scrolling during commencement ceremonies. While he was ON THE STAGE, no less. Colleges and universities are struggling with cell phone policies with students constantly caught using their mobile devices and laptops for non-academic purposes in academic settings and situations. But what's the punishment for a college Chancellor's "cellphone perusing"...during a commencement ceremony? Nothing, really.

Ironically, Alamo Colleges Chancellor Bruce Leslie pushed a self-help book titled The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People into the "system curriculum, replacing a required humanities course." He felt the need to do so after realizing "some graduates hardly looked him in the eye or knew how to shake his hand as they were accepting diplomas during graduation." Following the incident, Leslie apologized "if he offended anyone." He spent a reported 40 minutes scrolling on his smartphone during a commencement at Palo Alto College, where many graduates are first-generation, low-income, and predominantly Mexican-American college students.

This isn't Leslie's first time exhibiting poor etiquette in a professional setting - he's been known to behave poorly at faculty meetings as well. But Leslie is not alone. Other faculty, administrators, and even board members in the world of higher education have been caught drinking and sleeping during commencements. The entire law faculty at the University of California at Berkeley has been known to convene at 10 a.m., graduation day, and have a "leisurely lunch" while graduates filed on stage. They would regroup later, "oblivious to or unnoticed by parents and families."

Were students on their phones during the commencement ceremony? Some have argued that, despite the sometimes poor netiquette displayed by students, educators must be held to the "highest standards of comportment and professionalization," and that they "set institutional culture." One resolution to the problem is to jam cellular devices, but that is illegal since it may obstruct signal from an emergency call. Another option would be to Wi-Fi jam cellphones. Or perhaps implement a no cell phone policy for those on stage.

Do you think educators should have a stricter no cell phone policy? Should the Chancellor receive some form of punishment for his mobile misuse? Leave us your thoughtful comments below.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (5)

Posted Under:

College Culture , College Life , College News

Tags:


by Susan Dutca

One former and one current DePaul student disrupted a presentation at the school's student center earlier this week. One of them snatched the microphone from the interviewer and appeared to threaten the guest speaker, Milo Yiannopoulos, with it. The disturbance was reportedly due to the fundamental disagreement with the subject matter being presented, as it ran counter to that of the protesters who gathered outside prior to the event. However, only one arrest was made and it was not the protester who assaulted the young man interviewing Yiannopoulos, but rather the cameraman who was invited to film the event.

Hundreds of colleges and universities have restrictive speech codes that enforce political correctness and insulate their students from exposure to a lot of information, ideas, and opinions that may differ from that to which they have been exposed in their childhood. As evidenced by the recent shutdown of one conservative guest speaker's event hosted by DePaul's College Republicans at DePaul University, censorship in higher education is increasing at a considerable rate, apparently protecting those who demand that their voices be the only ones heard.

Milo Yiannopoulos, a Breitbart contributor and conservative commentator visited DePaul and spoke on issues of feminism, the transgender rights movement, campus politics, and microaggression. He spoke a solid 15 minutes before a whistle blew and a former DePaul student marched down the aisle to the front stage, and propped himself on the table between Yiannopoulos and the College Republican moderator. A current DePaul student joined shortly thereafter and the number of student protestors increased. One of the two student protestors who initially took the stage grabbed the microphone from the moderator and threatened Yiannopoulos with. Event organizers lost control of the event and it was ultimately cut short.

Spring, a time when most commencement speeches take place, is now referred to as "disinvitation season" in the world of higher education. Business leaders, politicians, authors and comedians are not welcome since social media has become home to endless arguments as to who is a worthy/appropriate/safe choice to deliver the speech. Professors have started to reconsider and restructure their courses in order to avoid sensitive and controversial topics. In response to the incident, DePaul University's President stated that he was "sorry to see” the video of the protest and news reports about it. In his statement he wrote, "Yesterday's speaker was invited to speak at DePaul, and those who interrupted the speech were wrong to do so.” He went on to say, "Universities welcome speakers, give their ideas a respectful hearing, and then respond with additional speech countering the ideas."

Do you think the protestors had the right to disrupt Yiannopoulos’ event? Should DePaul have done more to stop it? Leave us your thoughtful comments below.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (12)

Posted Under:

College Culture , College News

Tags:


by Susan Dutca

12-year-old Tanishq Abraham has already earned three associate's degrees and has been accepted to two University of California system four-year colleges. 60 percent of college students today are twice that age before they earn a single bachelor's degree.

Tanishq Abraham started taking college courses at age 7 and has been accepted to UC Davis and received the highest honor - a Regents Scholarship - to UC Santa Cruz. He plans to become a doctor and medical researcher before he turns 18. Although professors were reluctant to let him have such a large head start, he began community college when his peers were still in second grade and received three associate's degrees from American River College in general science; math and physical science; and foreign language students. He was allowed to attend under one condition: his mother, a veterinary doctor, had to be present during class. When he wasn't asking questions, he was busy explaining general relativity and special relativity to her.

Abraham joined the IQ society Mensa at the age of 4 and was known for picking up knowledge quickly. His accomplishments have earned him a letter of recognition from President Barak Obama. His younger sister Tiara is an award-winning singer and child genius, scoring a 99 percent on the Mensa IQ test.

Being a child prodigy isn't what many people think it is, Abraham claims. "When you think of a genius, you think of a mad scientist kind of thing." When he's not studying, Abraham is the typical, video-gaming, piano playing, and choir singing kid.

Starting and even graduating college early is a possibility, especially if you have a clear idea what field of study you wish to pursue. If you're still researching different major options, check out our list of major-specific scholarships. And most importantly, apply for and earn scholarships to not only graduate more quickly, but with little to no debt!

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (9)

by Susan Dutca

The Supreme Court recently avoided a major ruling on a case challenging the contraceptive coverage mandate in the Affordable Care Act. The justices decided to let the lower courts battle out the issue of faith-based organizations refusing to offer free contraceptive coverage for women.

This week, all seven cases in the consolidated Zubik v. Buwell, No. 14-1418 were sent back to their appeals courts by the Supreme Court on the issue of contraceptive coverage for women. Finding "no view on the merits of the cases," the opinion states that, "in particular, the Court does not decide whether petitioners' religious exercise has been substantially burdened, whether the Government has a compelling interest, or whether the current regulations are the least restrictive means of serving that interest." This could be viewed as the Supreme Court trying to keep their hands clean or perhaps forcing the government and religious organizations to compromise.

Religious organizations and institutions are not required to provide coverage through their insurance plans but must declare their decision to opt out. The government will then work with the school's insurance provider to continue offering the contraception coverage. However, faith-based schools are calling for a complete opt-out option that has them in no way shape or form “complicit with a practice they do not condone."

The Religious Freedom Act requires colleges to demonstrate that their beliefs are significantly violated and burdened by the contraceptive requirement. So far, 37 religiously-affiliated institutions in higher education have sued the federal government for forcing them to offer free contraception to women. The Obama administration has maintained its position to deny exemptions, stating that the arrangement does not violate the Religious Freedom Act or burden religious organizations.

How do you accommodate the moral objections of religious organizations schools while also offering contraception? Lawyers defending the schools cite that the Religious Freedom Act (1993) keeps the government from burdening their religious freedom. On the other hand, opponents state that federal laws already respect the religious beliefs of faith-based schools, and that a complete exemption isn't ideal since other religious groups - such as the Quakers who oppose financing wars with their tax money - do not get breaks just because they have a certain moral belief.

Do you think religious colleges and universities should be forced to provide contraceptive coverage for women if it contradicts their beliefs? Leave us your thoughtful comments below to start a discussion.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (16)

Posted Under:

College Culture , College News

Tags:


by Susan Dutca

A deceased college professor's 1985 Ford Mustang GT is on the market...to raise money for scholarships and honor the educator who, despite his 35 years of "superb teaching" had no campus memorialization. The vintage muscle car, valued at $15,500, will fund scholarships within three different departments at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.

Bill Vettes, the Marxist professor at UW-L, is fondly remembered for his humiliation of unprepared students, his "brutal intimidation," and his devotion to teaching "uncomfortable truths." While other classes such as Rec 100 were making snow angels outside his classroom, he demanded attention to "French philosophy with real-world insight." The annual Teacher of the Year Award was suspended after Vettes won it twice in four years.

Vettes' love for his sports cars was evidenced by his ownership of 15 of them - including a 1963 Corvette Stingray, a 1966 Jaguar XKE, a 1987 Mazda RX-7, a 1989 Camaro IROC, and a turbocharged 1991 Dodge Stealth RTU. The man who refused to drive a sports car for less than an hour had even given a former UW-L President's daughter a quick 110 mph ride to school.

Vettes' colleague Jim Parker will be selling the Mustang GT in honor of the Marxist sports car enthusiast. One-third of the proceeds will go to scholarships - one for students studying multicultural understanding, one for elementary education (with a focus on social justice issues), and the last for those majoring or minoring in women's studies or German studies. According to the La Crosse Tribune, the first two scholarships are self-sustaining and when “all three reach that point, Parker will start the William Vettes Scholarship."

If you're passionate about the automotive industry, education, social justice, women's studies, or foreign languages/cultures, check out some of our scholarships by types to begin funding your college education.

And remember, there’s no need to rely on expensive student loan options to pay for your college education. For more information on finding free scholarship money for college, conduct a Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (4)

by Susan Dutca

Work, work, work, work hard in school and you may just have your college tuition paid for by Rihanna. The Grammy-winning Barbadian singer and songwriter announced her initiative to help citizens or natives of Brazil, Barbados, Cuba, Haiti, Grenada, and Jamaica through scholarships of up to $50,000 per year. She stated that, "to be able to give the gift of an education is actually an honor...Higher education will provide perspective, opportunities and learning to a group of kids who really deserve this. I am thrilled to be able to do this."

Scholarship renewal is contingent upon maintaining a cumulative GPA of 2.5 and can be renewed every three years or until the international student earns their bachelor's degree, whichever comes first. Students must have been accepted into an accredited four-year college or university in the United States and demonstrate academic performance, leadership and participation in school and community activities, work experience and write a personal essay. It is unknown how much money will be disbursed annually.

Founded in 2012, Rihanna's well-known nonprofit Clara Lionel Foundation strives to improve the "quality of life for communities globally in the areas of health, education, arts and culture." The foundation has already donated $1.75 million to the oncology department at a Barbadian hospital. Additionally, her partnership with the makeup company MAC and the Viva Glam campaign raises money for those with AIDS and HIV. The sales from her first lipstick alone raised $60 million in 2013.

According to NPR, "students from these countries are generally not well-represented among the ranks of foreign students in the U.S." Despite the small percentage of these foreign students studying in the United States, there are plentiful scholarships and organizations dedicated to funding international students' college education. To get a glimpse, check out our scholarships for international students/study abroad.

And don't forget, you should pay for your college education with as much free money as possible! Find as many scholarships and grants as you can before turning to student loans. Visit the Scholarships.com free college scholarship search today where you'll get matched with countless scholarships and grants for which you qualify, then apply and win! It’s that easy!

Comments (28)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>
Page 1 of 99

Recent Posts

Tags

ACT (20)
Advanced Placement (24)
Alumni (17)
Applications (90)
Athletics (17)
Back To School (80)
Books (67)
Campus Life (471)
Career (115)
Choosing A College (65)
College (1025)
College Admissions (257)
College And Society (333)
College And The Economy (381)
College Applications (152)
College Benefits (292)
College Budgets (219)
College Classes (451)
College Costs (503)
College Culture (613)
College Goals (389)
College Grants (54)
College In Congress (91)
College Life (590)
College Majors (228)
College News (623)
College Prep (169)
College Savings Accounts (19)
College Scholarships (163)
College Search (122)
College Students (496)
College Tips (133)
Community College (59)
Community Service (40)
Community Service Scholarships (28)
Course Enrollment (19)
Economy (122)
Education (29)
Education Study (30)
Employment (42)
Essay Scholarship (39)
FAFSA (55)
Federal Aid (102)
Finances (71)
Financial Aid (419)
Financial Aid Information (61)
Financial Aid News (59)
Financial Tips (41)
Food (45)
Food/Cooking (28)
GPA (80)
Grades (91)
Graduate School (56)
Graduate Student Scholarships (21)
Graduate Students (65)
Graduation Rates (38)
Grants (63)
Health (38)
High School (135)
High School News (76)
High School Student Scholarships (185)
High School Students (320)
Higher Education (115)
Internships (526)
Job Search (179)
Just For Fun (122)
Loan Repayment (41)
Loans (50)
Military (16)
Money Management (134)
Online College (21)
Pell Grant (29)
President Obama (24)
Private Colleges (34)
Private Loans (20)
Roommates (100)
SAT (23)
Scholarship Applications (165)
Scholarship Information (179)
Scholarship Of The Week (272)
Scholarship Search (221)
Scholarship Tips (89)
Scholarships (405)
Sports (63)
Sports Scholarships (22)
Stafford Loans (24)
Standardized Testing (46)
State Colleges (43)
State News (36)
Student Debt (86)
Student Life (513)
Student Loans (142)
Study Abroad (68)
Study Skills (215)
Teachers (94)
Technology (111)
Tips (514)
Transfer Scholarship (17)
Tuition (93)
Undergraduate Scholarships (37)
Undergraduate Students (155)
Volunteer (45)
Work And College (83)
Work Study (20)
Writing Scholarship (19)

Categories

529 Plan (2)
Back To School (385)
College And The Economy (570)
College Applications (275)
College Budgets (365)
College Classes (594)
College Costs (828)
College Culture (1009)
College Grants (150)
College In Congress (154)
College Life (1067)
College Majors (355)
College News (1043)
College Savings Accounts (59)
College Search (404)
Coverdell (1)
FAFSA (125)
Federal Aid (157)
Fellowships (25)
Financial Aid (743)
Food/Cooking (79)
GPA (281)
Graduate School (109)
Grants (81)
High School (576)
High School News (268)
Housing (175)
Internships (580)
Just For Fun (250)
Press Releases (24)
Roommates (144)
Scholarship Applications (254)
Scholarship Of The Week (380)
Scholarships (685)
Sports (80)
Standardized Testing (62)
Student Loans (232)
Study Abroad (63)
Tips (873)
Uncategorized (7)
Virtual Intern (571)