Students Returning from College, Without Diplomas


August 10, 2007
by Scholarships.com Staff

        Ever been told to finish what you started? That’s not bad advice. Students are being
        taught the value of a good education, and the counsel is working. College entrance
        rates have been going up for years. Classrooms are filling up, and dormitories are
        busting at the seams. Whether or not students are graduating is a different story.

Ever been told to finish what you started? That’s not bad advice. Students are being taught the value of a good education, and the counsel is working. College entrance rates have been going up for years. Classrooms are filling up, and dormitories are busting at the seams. Whether or not students are graduating is a different story.

According to a study conducted by ACT, a not-for-profit organization providing research services, only 74.5% of first-year students attending public four-year colleges return the following year. Those attending private four-year colleges fared a bit better, but barely. Graduation rates at private colleges were only .7% better than those at public ones, down from 5.8% in 1988. Sending a student to a more expensive private college is unlikely to solve the problem.

And arguing that these students are simply transferring doesn’t cut it either. According to an article released by the Associated Press, only 54% of students who entered a four-year university in 1997 had a degree six years later. Unless you’re Van Wilder, you should have something to show after six years.

Despite a spike in the number of students who attend college and obtain degrees, a high dropout percentage continues to be a problem. As a matter of fact, the rate is the same as it was in 1988. So many more ambitious students are vying for each college spot, but about one in four still quits after the first year. What’s the problem?

According to the ACT survey, the top two factors contributing to student failure were lack of motivation and inadequate financial resources. These two problems can be solved, but students need to take matters into their own hands.

Lack of student motivation was ranked as the biggest determinant of college failure—even more than a student’s academic fit for a particular school. This means that a student who can get their act together need not be discouraged by campus nerds. Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard.

Students should also keep their future in mind during stressful college times. Those who have yet to pinpoint a career may have a hard time identifying goals, but obtaining a degree is a great goal in itself. A degree gives students options. Those who change their minds about future plans may always return to school. In the mean time, a degree gives students something to fall back on.

As you surely know, more jobs than before require degrees. In fact, degrees are just the beginning. It is not uncommon for an employer to look your resume up and down and declare that your impressive background would make you a perfect fit for the company: no one would match your paper-filing skills.

The second biggest obstacle standing between a student and their degree was financial need. Students who spend a bundle on their education may suffer financially after dropping out. No education and no money is not a good combo. There are plenty of financial aid options, and students should take advantage of them.

The best money is, of course, free money. By filing a FASFA and searching Scholarships.com for grant and scholarship opportunities, students have the chance to find free college funding, no strings attached. Those who can save ahead of time should look into setting up a college savings account. Some good choices may be the 529 and the Coverdell as they allow students to accumulate money, tax-free. For more savings account options, visit the Scholarships.com Resources Section. Loans, as a last resort, can generally be obtained at lower rates when borrowed from the government. Take advantage of any aid offered. Don’t leave your purchase at the door: get the degree and the education you paid for.

Just because there are millions of college scholarships out there doesn’t mean you have time to go searching, and many won’t even match your profile. We’ve done the work and Scholarships.com is totally free. We have the search algorithms and scholarships database, saving you time in searching, finding and applying to thousands of dollars in college scholarships. Get instantly matched to scholarships that meet your unique talents, skillset and strengths, only those you qualify for. Access a complete list of college scholarships now by conducting a free college scholarship search at Scholarships.com.

Posted Under : College and the Economy

Discuss

Share your thoughts and perhaps thousands of students will benefit from your unique insight on the subject!



If you can read this, don't touch the following fields


 
The U.S. Department of Education will offer a contract to a single loan servicer to manage its $1.2 trillion student loan portfolio, which contains over 43 million borrowers. Instead of keeping its current contract with four different services, the ED will award Navient, GreatNet or the Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency (PHEAA) the contract. What exactly does this mean for borrowers?

Department of Education Seeking Single Loan Servicer

May 23, 2017 10:23 AM
by Susan Dutca
The U.S. Department of Education will offer a contract to a single loan servicer to manage its $1.2 trillion student loan portfolio, which contains over 43 million borrowers. Instead of keeping its
Roughly half of foster youth graduate high school or receive a high school equivalency diploma by age 19, and less than four percent of foster children earn a bachelor's degree. Getting into college and paying for it is already difficult, so how do foster youth in higher education overcome seemingly impossible obstacles?

Finding Foster Youth College Scholarships on the Web

May 8, 2017 4:27 PM
by Susan Dutca
Roughly half of foster youth graduate high school or receive a high school equivalency diploma by age 19, and less than four percent of foster children earn a bachelor's degree. Getting into college

    May 1st is National College Decision Day! There are so many colleges from which to choose and a lot of students are applying to several schools, some even more than a dozen. Naturally, the cost of college will be a major deciding factor for many of you and continuing to find outside scholarships could be very helpful to most. Students are wary of taking out too many student loans and possibly even forego a more prestigious school in favor for a less expensive college if they fear they won't able to afford the tuition without taking on enormous student debt. One way to avoid doing this and help make college affordable is by applying to free college scholarships. There's no reason you shouldn’t be able to attend your dream college - you still have time to pocket some free college scholarship money before heading off to college!

National Decision Day 2017 College Scholarships

May 1, 2017 4:13 PM
by Susan Dutca
May 1st is National College Decision Day! There are so many colleges from which to choose and a lot of students are applying to several schools, some even more than a dozen. Naturally, the cost

    Being a college student can be daunting, period. With the surplus in coursework, responsibilities and stressing over college debt and expenses, college students are high-anxiety all year round...not just around finals time. On top of that, some student-parents must manage going to, and paying for college while raising and paying for their children. Fortunately, there are great financial aid resources and college scholarships reserved for students who have families; including students with dependent children, single mom scholarships, and single dad scholarships! With Mother's Day right around the corner, indulge in these exclusive free college scholarships- for your accomplishments as a student and mom.

College Scholarships for Moms

April 21, 2017 4:06 PM
by Susan Dutca
Being a college student can be daunting, period. With the surplus in coursework, responsibilities and stressing over college debt and expenses, college students are high-anxiety all year
New York's free college scholarship program is being met with heavy criticism as more details have emerged and it is set to start in fall of 2017. Though lauded for being the first of its kind to offer free college tuition at public colleges and universities, many European countries already offer free college, regardless of family income level...and at the tax payers' expense.

New York Free College Scholarship Program Not So "Free"?

April 18, 2017 11:23 AM
by Susan Dutca
New York's free college scholarship program is being met with heavy criticism as more details have emerged and it is set to start in fall of 2017. Though lauded for being the first of its kind to