College Student Loses Scholarship, Sues School


March 20, 2018 2:46 PM
by Susan Dutca
A former University of Central Florida football player who lost his athletic scholarship for his YouTube antics is now suing the university for allegedly violating his constitutional rights. In its defense, the university claims he violated NCAA rules on players not making money from their likeness and reputation.

A former University of Central Florida football player who lost his athletic scholarship for his "YouTube antics" is now suing the university for allegedly violating his constitutional rights. In its defense, the university claims he violated NCAA rules "on players not making money from their likeness and reputation."

Donald De La Haye began making YouTube videos in 2011, prior to joining the University of Central Florida's football team - videos such as "poking fun at Colin Kaepernick and chucking a football on a makeshift Slip-n-Slide." His videos earned him over a half a million followers, but cost him a place on the team and his athletic scholarship. UCF upheld the NCAA rules that bars athletes from receiving compensation when using their names or athletic talent which, according to De La Haye, silenced and violated his free speech rights, protected under the First and Fourteenth Amendment. Furthermore, he claims that the "scholarship removal was 'arbitrary and unreasonable' because it wasn't related to his academic or disciplinary standing, or his athletic performance."

The lawsuit also states that De La Haye began receiving "modest compensation" from YouTube after gaining popularity for his videos. Prior to having his athletic scholarship rescinded, he reportedly "offered to discontinue this deal on videos that referenced his status as a football player or showed off his athletic prowess." In response, the university stated that he could not post anything football-related if other videos earned him money, and went on to take his scholarship away.

The courts have "deemed the [NCAA] a private entity, not a state actor," and therefore, De La Haye couldn't allege a constitutional violation against it. In your opinion, does De La Haye deserve to have his scholarship revoked based on his actions and current NCAA rules? Why or why not?

College is expensive, Scholarships.com is completely free. Pay for your college education with as much free college scholarship money as possible. By applying to all the awards you qualify for, you can be sure to not miss a single opportunity in paying for your college expenses - including tuition, fees, room and board. Get matched to college scholarships instantly and start applying today by conducting a free college scholarship search at Scholarships.com.

Discuss

Share your thoughts and perhaps thousands of students will benefit from your unique insight on the subject!



If you can read this, don't touch the following fields


 

Marie D.  on  4/15/2018 11:10:55 PM commented:

Actions have consequences. I have a feeling he doesn't understand that.

Todd T  on  4/4/2018 1:47:56 PM commented:

All scholarships come with strings. If you have failing grades, you pay it back. If you change your major, you lose it. If you do certain things, like get other scholarships, you may lose it. If you want your free speech, refuse the scholarship. Find another or another way to pay. But to get a scholarship, which comes with obligations, and be offended when you don't want to follow the obligations of the scholarship shows he needs a little more high school to be ready for college. He does not understand accountability. He does not understand rules. And he does not understand college attendance is a privilege, not a right. He has no right to a scholarship. Go to the military like I did. But again, if the rule is you can get this if you do this, you say yes, don't do the activity, get it taken away and think you have had your rights violated means you are a liberal and are drinking the kool-aide. Not in the real world. Snowflake. Needs to grow up and this is just the lesson to get him st

Todd T  on  4/4/2018 1:47:52 PM commented:

All scholarships come with strings. If you have failing grades, you pay it back. If you change your major, you lose it. If you do certain things, like get other scholarships, you may lose it. If you want your free speech, refuse the scholarship. Find another or another way to pay. But to get a scholarship, which comes with obligations, and be offended when you don't want to follow the obligations of the scholarship shows he needs a little more high school to be ready for college. He does not understand accountability. He does not understand rules. And he does not understand college attendance is a privilege, not a right. He has no right to a scholarship. Go to the military like I did. But again, if the rule is you can get this if you do this, you say yes, don't do the activity, get it taken away and think you have had your rights violated means you are a liberal and are drinking the kool-aide. Not in the real world. Snowflake. Needs to grow up and this is just the lesson to get him st

 Photo obtained by ABC News.

A gun-toting Tennessee college senior showed her support for President Trump and guns while holding her shirt up to reveal her handgun in her graduation photos to show who [she is] as a person. The photo, which went viral on Twitter, gained both positive and negative feedback - some of which claimed she was brandishing a firearm for a photo shoot or showing it off to try and look cool.

Gun-Toting College Girl Faces Backlash for Grad Photo

April 10, 2018 11:05 AM
by Susan Dutca
Photo obtained by ABC News. A gun-toting Tennessee college senior showed her support for President Trump and guns while holding her shirt up to reveal her handgun in her graduation photos to
A former University of Central Florida football player who lost his athletic scholarship for his YouTube antics is now suing the university for allegedly violating his constitutional rights. In its defense, the university claims he violated NCAA rules on players not making money from their likeness and reputation.

College Student Loses Scholarship, Sues School

March 20, 2018 2:46 PM
by Susan Dutca
A former University of Central Florida football player who lost his athletic scholarship for his "YouTube antics" is now suing the university for allegedly violating his constitutional rights. In its
An autistic Orange Coast College student who was barred from campus is suing the institution for $5 million, claiming it mistreated him. The civil lawsuit was filed after an altercation where the student was pepper-sprayed and arrested for felony vandalism and misdemeanor charges.

Autistic Student Alleges Assault, Sues College for $5M

March 13, 2018 2:56 PM
by Susan Dutca
An autistic Orange Coast College student who was barred from campus is suing the institution for $5 million, claiming it mistreated him. The civil lawsuit was filed after an altercation where the

    You don't need to have the luck of the Irish to apply for and win these March scholarships. If you want to see a little more green in your future to help pay your college tuition, you will need to explore, review and apply for these March 2018 scholarships. If you prefer to get a list of personalized scholarships for which you qualify instead, conduct a free scholarship search here.

Land Your Pot of Gold with March 2018 Scholarships

March 7, 2018 3:52 PM
by Susan Dutca
You don't need to have the luck of the Irish to apply for and win these March scholarships. If you want to see a little more green in your future to help pay your college tuition, you will need
A new Stanford Student group, the Stanford Students Against Addictive Devices (SSAD) led a student-protest over the weekend asking Apple for help in getting its users to put their phones down. Led by computer science majors, the group wants to bring awareness to the public health issue which, research shows, can have serious implications for people's mental and physical health.

Stanford Students Call on Apple to Combat Phone Addiction

March 6, 2018 1:56 PM
by Susan Dutca
A new Stanford Student group, the Stanford Students Against Addictive Devices (SSAD) led a student-protest over the weekend asking Apple for help in getting its users to put their phones down. Led by