College Avenue Student Loans Edvisors Private Student Loans

Scholarship News

Free College Introduced in 4 More States


August 23, 2017 9:15 AM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
More and more colleges are introducing free college scholarship programs, with more than 20 states currently on board. The latest states to join the free community-college program initiative are Arkansas, Indiana, Montana and Rhode Island. Some critics claim that, while the idea sounds great, free college may not actually help those who need it most.

More and more colleges are introducing free college scholarship programs, with more than 20 states currently on board. The latest states to join the free community-college program initiative are Arkansas, Indiana, Montana and Rhode Island. Some critics claim that, while the idea sounds great, free college may not actually help those who need it most.

New York's Excelsior Scholarship already awards free tuition for four years to state residents whose family household adjusted gross income caps out at $100,000. Excelsior Scholarship recipients are able to attend SUNY or CUNY college without paying tuition, granted that they plan to live and work in New York once they have graduated college. Announced earlier this August, Rhode Island will also offer a free college scholarship to state residents who intend to remain in-state after graduation. Unlike the Excelsior Scholarship, Rhode Island's free college Promise Scholarship does not have an income requirement.

The free college program in Arkansas will award its first grants in the fall to traditional or nontraditional students who enroll in a STEM or other high-demand fields at state community or technical colleges. ArFuture, or the Arkansas Future Grant, is a last-dollar grant which will be dispersed only after students have received federal and state aid and requires grant recipients to work full-time in Arkansas for at least three years after graduation. If the free college scholarship requirements are not met, "the grant converts to a loan that must be repaid to the state."

Some critics argue that lower-income students already receive financial aid through grants and scholarships and don't pay much tuition for in-state colleges and universities. "In fact, tying the scholarship to four-year programs could increase costs for low-income students, who would otherwise complete a two-year program and enter the workforce more quickly." For students whose family incomes are less than $60,000 a year, free college programs won't "do anything to help the group that really does need help the most," according to the Director of the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute.

It's important to read all the requirements and fine print when it comes to free college scholarship programs and know what scholarships will cover - many such scholarships do not cover books, or room and board.

College is expensive, Scholarships.com is completely free. Pay for your college education with as much free college scholarship money as possible. By applying to all the awards you qualify for, you can be sure to not miss a single opportunity in paying for your college expenses - including tuition, fees, room and board. Get matched to college scholarships instantly and start applying today by conducting a free college scholarship search at Scholarships.com.

Discuss

Share your thoughts and perhaps thousands of students will benefit from your unique insight on the subject!



If you can read this, don't touch the following fields


 

Jesse R  on  8/23/2017 7:37:40 PM commented:

Privately-funded scholarships like the ones connected through here or merit-based scholarships: good Public, Government-funded free college for all/those who come from families that make less than 100,000 annually: bad. Here's why: The privately-funded/merit-based scholarships often require a student to keep high marks in their classes, encouraging them to study and learn the importance of hard work. The government, free-for-all-student "scholarships" often do not require students to keep up a high gpa, such as a 3.5 ('A' and 'B' average). At most, the free-for-all ones require only a 2.0 ('C' average), which lowers the bar and doesn't motivate students to put in the extra effort needed to achieve a higher goal. That isn't even going over the extreme financial resources and cash (your taxes) the government must spend in order to keep the free college running, seeing as colleges are much more expensive to maintain than a normal K-12 school, per student.

The college dining hall – a place for food, friends and well-earned breaks. It’s known for a wide array of food bars, buffets, made-to-order stations and generous ice cream offerings. But for the Fall 2020 semester, the dining experience will undergo a reinvention to serve food safely amidst the novel coronavirus. What will the dining halls of the COVID-19 era look like?

New Menus for College Dining in Fall 2020

June 30, 2020 10:56 AM
by Izzy Hall
The college dining hall – a place for food, friends and well-earned breaks. It’s known for a wide array of food bars, buffets, made-to-order stations and generous ice cream offerings. But for the
If you're worried about how you will pay for college during the COVID-19 pandemic, you're not alone. Students and families are concerned about the college financial ramifications as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, and higher education institutions are anticipating an increase in students' financial aid need, as well as a large number of college financial aid appeals. Fortunately, there are ample options and resources to help you pay for college these coming semesters. Explore the various options to find out which works best for your situation - from scholarship deadline extensions to relief provided through the CARES Act and more.

Paying for College during Coronavirus

June 26, 2020 3:48 PM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
If you're worried about how you will pay for college during the COVID-19 pandemic, you're not alone. Students and families are concerned about the college financial ramifications as a result of the
On June 1st, Kansas State began bringing back student athletes to start football pre-season training with voluntary workouts. By June 20th, with 13 students testing positive for coronavirus, they shut their workout program down. What happened to the Kansas State athletes wasn’t unique – as schools, hoping to bring back the moneymaker that is college football, are discovering. And it provides an early look at what schools could be facing if they plan to re-open their campuses come the fall.

College Football Pre-Season Gets off on Wrong Foot

June 25, 2020 3:14 PM
by Izzy Hall
On June 1st, Kansas State began bringing back student athletes to start football pre-season training with voluntary workouts. By June 20th, with 13 students testing positive for coronavirus, they
Students want to go to campus this fall. Schools would like to have them there. But campus won’t be the same as it always has. In order to prevent the spread of coronavirus, colleges and universities are instituting new policies and discussing new living arrangements for their incoming students. Beyond social distancing, face masks and hand sanitizer, here are changes colleges are considering for students living on campus.

What Will Living on Campus Look Like This Fall?

June 16, 2020 10:51 AM
by Izzy Hall
Students want to go to campus this fall. Schools would like to have them there. But campus won’t be the same as it always has. In order to prevent the spread of coronavirus, colleges and universities