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Graduate School Programs

Whether you’re looking into graduate school because you think it’ll advance your career, increase your pay, or educate you more in a field of study you’re passionate about, questions about where you’ll go, how you’ll apply, and how you’ll pay for that additional two, four, or more years of schooling are questions even the most prepared graduate school applicant thinks long and hard about. We’ve come up with information on some of the most common graduate school programs — business, law, and medical school — although much of the advice we offer can be applied across disciplines. Determining whether to go to graduate school is definitely a situation where you need to consult a pros and cons list. Will it help you professionally, or are you looking for an escape from the job market? Can you afford it, or will your advanced degree be taken care of primarily through high-interest student loans? Take a look at what we think you should be thinking about before you apply, and what you should do once you decide graduate school is right for you.

Business School

Whether you’re already working in a business-related field, or interested in making yourself more business-savvy before a foray into the world of entrepreneurship or a leadership or management position, business school may be a good place for you to pick up those necessary skills. Business school is no longer only for those with bachelor’s degrees in accounting, marketing or other related majors; schools today want to graduate varied students who come from different backgrounds and fields of study. We’ve come up with some information on things you should know about deciding to go, applying for business school, and paying for that advanced degree.

Law School

Law school isn’t just for future lawyers. Successful academics, business leaders, journalists and politicians often boast law degrees on their resumes, which suggests that getting through law school takes quite a bit of hard work and perseverance. If you think a law degree will help you meet your goals, whether you’re interested in a traditional law career or have aspirations to become a court justice or legislator, there can be a lot to consider before signing up for that LSAT. We’ve come up with some information on things you should know about deciding to go, applying for law school, and paying for that advanced degree.

Medical School

Medical school isn’t for those who loathed their college years. Most medical school students will have at least an additional four to six years of schooling on top of their undergraduate careers. Those interested in certain specialties should expect even more time in school, with internships and residencies tacking more years (and, most likely, more debt) onto those totals. If you’re passionate enough about it, though, there’s a good chance you’ll succeed. The vast majority of those who get through those first few years of medical school end up passing their licensing and board exams and becoming doctors. We’ve come up with some information on things you should know about deciding to go, applying for medical school, and paying for that advanced degree.

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Rush Week/Greek Life for Fall 2020

July 14, 2020

by Izzy Hall

Fraternities and sororities are important institutions that connect young men and women throughout their academic careers, forming close relationships that last into their professional lives. Fall semester is an exciting and busy time for fraternities and sororities as they welcome members back to campus and hold Rush Week events to hand-pick new members. Returning fraternity and sorority students have a big challenge for Fall 2020 — how will they adapt Greek Life and Rush Week for the coronavirus era? [...]

Ivy League, Big Ten Schools Alter Fall College Football Plans

July 10, 2020

by Izzy Hall

With pre-season voluntary football practices leading to alarming numbers of new coronavirus cases, some schools have reconsidered their college athletic programs for the upcoming fall semester. On Wednesday the Ivy League postponed their fall college sports season until 2021, while on Thursday the Big Ten Conference announced that teams would play conference-only schedules should college sports resume in the fall. [...]

Colleges May Bring Students to Campus for Online Instruction

July 7, 2020

by Izzy Hall

With coronavirus cases on the rise in the United States, colleges are reevaluating their plans for the fall 2020 semester. Some schools have decided to bring a percentage of students back to campus – only for those students to engage in the same online learning that their off-campus peers would. [...]