News Articles About Higher Education

As a high school student in the midst of the standardized testing season and living through the COVID-19 pandemic, you may be wondering what the future holds for standardized test scores, AP courses, and the college admissions process. A recent survey conducted by The College Board revealed than 91 percent of 18,000 polled enrollees still want to take their AP tests. In fact, in 900 pages of comments responding to the AP survey, AP students begged to be allowed at least one championship bout with an AP test.

Coronavirus Impact on SAT, ACT, and AP Testing

March 26, 2020 2:56 PM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
As a high school student in the midst of the standardized testing season and living through the COVID-19 pandemic, you may be wondering what the future holds for standardized test scores, AP courses,
Negotiations and proposals for an economic stimulus package are being mulled over by lawmakers, ones that will ultimately affect school and education funding. Currently, student-loan borrowers are able enter forbearance on their student loans for 60 days without accruing interest. The U.S. Department of Education will also suspend student loan payments by borrowers who are over 31 days delinquent. The White House has already announced that it will waive the interest on federal student loan payments. Here are some of the recent developments in proposed relief for students, colleges and universities as part of the COVID-19 stimulus plan:

Coronavirus Stimulus Package: Higher Ed Edition

March 24, 2020 11:51 AM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
Negotiations and proposals for an economic stimulus package are being mulled over by lawmakers, ones that will ultimately affect school and education funding. Currently, student-loan borrowers are
True love - at least for college-bound high school seniors and current college students - comes in the form of free college financial aid, especially during the month of February. This February is Financial Aid Awareness Month 2020, and Scholarships.com celebrates it with the rest of the higher education community by helping students and families navigate the college financial aid process and educating them about access to federal, state, and institutional college financial aid.

To help students strengthen their financial aid literacy, higher education institutions and organizations host webinars, field questions on social media and host weekly topics that allow parents and students to ask questions about college scholarships, college grants, FAFSA, student loans, and other ways to pay for college. During this upcoming Financial Aid Awareness Month, Scholarships.com will do what it has always done best. We'll be offering the best college scholarship opportunities and college scholarship information out there. As we see it, high school scholarships and college scholarships are the best types of college financial aid because they do not need to be repaid. To help kick off Financial Aid Awareness Month, Scholarships.com put together a list of high school and college student financial aid resources that you'll love.

Financial Aid Awareness Month - February 2020 Edition

January 30, 2020 10:42 AM
by Scholarships.com Staff
True love - at least for college-bound high school seniors and current college students - comes in the form of free college financial aid, especially during the month of February. This February is
It's senior year of high school and you're just about ready to graduate and move on to the next chapter in your life. Have you been accepted to college, enrolled in the military or a trade school, planned a gap-year or secured a job? If not, you may not be eligible to receive your diploma. Starting in 2020, Chicago high school seniors will have to demonstrate any one of the above in order to graduate.

Chicago Schools: "No Plan, No Diploma"

July 11, 2017 9:28 AM
by Susan Dutca-Lovell
It's senior year of high school and you're just about ready to graduate and move on to the next chapter in your life. Have you been accepted to college, enrolled in the military or a trade school,
It’s that time of year when housing assignments start coming out for the upcoming school year. Some students will know their roommates, but many won’t. Moving onto campus is a very exciting moment for students. It certainly was for me. It means getting away from home and getting to have your own space. For many of us, it also means learning to share space with another person. It’s a challenging, but fun experience.

Insight on Dorm Life

July 24, 2015
by Erica Lewis
It’s that time of year when housing assignments start coming out for the upcoming school year. Some students will know their roommates, but many won’t. Moving onto campus is a very exciting moment
Forgive me if this seems a bit nerdy but I listen to soundtracks when I write and one of the most important things I wrote in my high school career was my Common Application essay. Preparing for this essay was overwhelming but it helped me to collect a master soundtrack that triggered all the questions I needed to answer.

Discovering Your Personal Soundtrack for Success

July 22, 2015
by Emily Rabinowitz
Forgive me if this seems a bit nerdy but I listen to soundtracks when I write and one of the most important things I wrote in my high school career was my Common Application essay. Preparing for this
Commuting from home is awesome or awful depending on the student. Do the benefits of commuting outweigh the negatives? As a commuter student, I have firsthand experience with the pros as well as the cons.

Boredom: Some colleges are simply limited on the activities students can participate in, which can cause students to become bored easily. As a commuter, however, I know the surrounding areas of my college and never really get bored. If there is nothing on campus, I just hang out friends and do something we would have done in high school like local sporting events or concerts.

Comfort: The hardest thing for many freshmen is adjusting to college life. I didn't have this issue: I get to come home to my family every day, limiting homesickness. My regular schedule has not changed and if I need my parents urgently, they are not far from my reach.

Time Management: Going to college is a big jump from the previous independence most high school students have experienced but the lack of structure can negatively impact your time management. Commuting from home gives you a sample of independence without removing the safety net. Yes, college requires more energy, reading, studying and participation in general; however, living at home means I rely on parents a little bit so I can focus on my studies and not constantly worry about a healthy non-cafeteria meal or laundry. Mom helps me out!

Saving Money: Probably the biggest benefit of commuting from home is saving money. Sure, I pay gas to drive to campus but its total expense does not compare to the cost of room and board. For a family like mine who does not receive any financial aid but still could use it, commuting from home seemed like the best option to save.

Commuting from home is not for everybody but for some, it is really the perfect fit. And if it isn't? Use the money you saved to move onto or closer to campus further into your college years.

The Pros and Cons of Commuting

July 15, 2015
by Ashley Grego
Commuting from home is awesome or awful depending on the student. Do the benefits of commuting outweigh the negatives? As a commuter student, I have firsthand experience with the pros as well as the
Why should you use scholarship websites? How should you use them? And what are the chances of you actually getting scholarships off of these sites? I had the opportunity to interview Scholarships.com VP Kevin Ladd and here's what I found.

Why Students Should Use Scholarship Websites

July 15, 2015
by Genevieve Grant
Why should you use scholarship websites? How should you use them? And what are the chances of you actually getting scholarships off of these sites? I had the opportunity to interview Scholarships.com
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