AXA Achievement Scholarship

$25,000

December 14, 2019

Awards Available: 350

Apply Now!
  • Scholarship Description
  • The AXA Achievement Scholarship provides over $1.4 million in scholarships to young people throughout the nation representing all 50 states, Washington DC and Puerto Rico. Students have the opportunity to receive a scholarship at the level of $2,500, $10,000 or $25,000. AXA Achievers and scholarship amount will be chosen based on AXA Achievement criteria including a student's prior accomplishments and ability to succeed in college.

    Applicants must be current high school seniors who plan to enroll full-time in an accredited two-year or four-year college or university in the United States for the entire academic year. Special consideration is given to achievements that empower society to mitigate risk through education and/or action in areas such as financial, environmental, health, safety and/or emergency preparedness. For more information or to apply, please visit the scholarship provider's website.
  • Contact
  • Scholarship Committee
  • 1290 Avenue of the Americas
  • New York, NY 10104
  • 800-537-4180

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Comments (8)

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Isabelle V  on 5/2/2018 7:58:46 PM

I applied for this scholarship because I am in financial need and I am trying to be the first in my family to go to college.

rebecca C  on 12/28/2017 8:47:23 AM

I applied for this scholarship all the way back in August but have not heard anything about if I won or not. I am worried because I might not be able to go to collage without scholarship help and I have applied to a lot of them but haven't got any when a lot of my class mates already received word if they have gotten a scholarship or not.

Mark G  on 12/13/2017 8:43:04 AM

I applied for this scholarship because I have to pay for college by myself and I need financial help. Thank you!

Ellie R  on 12/11/2017 9:05:48 PM

I applied to this scholarship because I've experienced poverty and my future will be dedicated to ending poverty and social class in America so no child has to go through what I have.

Oleah C  on 12/11/2017 12:20:17 PM

I applied for this scholarship for financial help.

nathan J  on 12/7/2017 10:57:09 AM

i applied for this scholarship because i am in need of financial aid to help further my education

Paulette G  on 11/19/2017 8:19:37 PM

Hi! I applied for this scholarship for financial help. Thank you!

Maya M  on 12/15/2016 9:07:36 AM

I applied

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